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G-Force and (possibly) Centrifugal force applied to the rotation of a car

by SignSeeker7
Tags: centifugal, centripetal, g-force
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SignSeeker7
#1
Jun3-12, 12:40 PM
P: 14
1. I'm in my first year of physics, and the end-of-year project is a bit of a doozy: find two examples of misapplied physics in movies and explain how it's wrong. For my first example, I chose a scene from the movie "The Iron Giant," in which the Giant picks up a car with Hogarth, our child protagonist, inside, and then rotates his torso incredibly fast, like a merry-go-round. I noticed that despite the incredible speed, no "centrifugal" force was being applied; Hogarth was sitting in the driver's seat, but not moving towards the outside of the car.
I'm having trouble with the centrifugal force, which I believe is an equal-but-opposite reaction to centripetal force (though I'm not quite sure), and calculating the G-force, which I'm not sure how to do.

radius- assuming Hogarth's claim that the Giant is 100 ft. tall, and that the Giant is similarly proportional to a human, the radius - the length of his arm- would be approximately 50 feet, or 15.24 meters.
Speed- about 5 revolutions in 2 seconds- 150 revolutions in 1 minute, or 1 revolution in 0.4 seconds.
Velocity- 239.39 meters/second.
Mass- assuming the mass of the car is about 5000 lbs. and Hogarth is about 80 lbs., then their combined total is about 2304.25 kg.
Centripetal acceleration- 3,755.94 meters per second squared
Centripetal force- 8,654,630 N

2. Ac = V squared / r
V = (2∏r)/T
Fc = (m[V squared]) / r



3. I've found a bunch of factors, but I'm not sure how they relate to each other and how they show that Hogarth should be suffering from more G-force and moving outwards.
And I'm not sure I'm even applying the correct equations or principles, or if what I'm trying to find is what I actually need to find.
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