Register to reply

Note Taking (from textbooks)

by Cod
Tags: note, textbooks
Share this thread:
Cod
#1
Jan29-05, 09:49 PM
P: 308
I recently enlisted in the US Air Force so I am not attending school this semester; however, I'm still trying to continue strengthening my mathematical skills as well as adventure into new parts of mathematics. I've recently purchased a few new textbooks on an assortment of math subjects and I have run into a problem. That problem is simple. I do not know a good way to take notes from a textbook. Usually, I just take lecture notes from my professors since they basically serve you the important points on a platter. So how do I know which points I should write down and which I should not? Is there an easy method to note-taking from math textbooks?

Any help, information, or tips are greatly appreciated.
Phys.Org News Partner Mathematics news on Phys.org
Professor quantifies how 'one thing leads to another'
Team announces construction of a formal computer-verified proof of the Kepler conjecture
Iranian is first woman to win 'Nobel Prize of maths' (Update)
JasonRox
#2
Jan29-05, 10:08 PM
HW Helper
PF Gold
JasonRox's Avatar
P: 2,327
Quote Quote by Cod
I recently enlisted in the US Air Force so I am not attending school this semester; however, I'm still trying to continue strengthening my mathematical skills as well as adventure into new parts of mathematics. I've recently purchased a few new textbooks on an assortment of math subjects and I have run into a problem. That problem is simple. I do not know a good way to take notes from a textbook. Usually, I just take lecture notes from my professors since they basically serve you the important points on a platter. So how do I know which points I should write down and which I should not? Is there an easy method to note-taking from math textbooks?

Any help, information, or tips are greatly appreciated.
I don't write notes if I'm doing independent studying. I just highlight certain things like important definitions, and theorems. I won't highlight obvious statements.

I'd go with highlighting.

If you choose not to, just write down important definitions and theorems (as well as the page number). I would also write down the solutions to the questions who don't have solutions in the back of the text (I always do this).
fourier jr
#3
Jan29-05, 10:54 PM
P: 948
i don't like vandalizing my books with a highlighter so i write down the important stuff, like theorems that have names.

misogynisticfeminist
#4
Jan30-05, 01:27 AM
P: 388
Note Taking (from textbooks)

How I do it is I simply skim through the first few pages, until the first example. Then take note of how the example is done, at least have a rough idea, then go back again to the first part of the topic and you'l sieve out the useful stuff much easier. When you're confident that you know the process, then go do the example without looking at the solutions first, then when you're done check it.

But i think note taking when learning from a textbook is good. I do take down notes myself when learning from textbooks but hardly refer to them after that. The note taking is meant to help me get into focus and summarize whatever I need to know.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Taking Physical Chemistry before formally taking Quantum Mechanics Academic Guidance 17
Note-taking in undergrad degrees Academic Guidance 40
Note taking method Academic Guidance 8
New synchronizing and note taking tool Computing & Technology 0
On a lighter note... General Discussion 25