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Applied physics to theoretical

by Nathew
Tags: applied, physics, theoretical
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Nathew
#1
Apr13-13, 08:16 PM
P: 39
Okay, so, the college I will probably attend is more of a applied physics program. If I want to go on to study particle physics or even theoretical physics would I have a chance if my bachelors is in applied physics?

I talked with the head of physics and he said they have a combined math physics program that will allow me to learn the maths necessary for higher physics. Is this a good plan?
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Jorriss
#2
Apr13-13, 08:34 PM
P: 1,042
What is an applied physics program?

Much of theoretical physics is what I imagine most would consider applied physics.
Nathew
#3
Apr14-13, 01:03 AM
P: 39
Like the program doesn't go into general relativity or stuff like that.

ZapperZ
#4
Apr14-13, 08:31 AM
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Applied physics to theoretical

This appears to be another example of a wrong understanding of what "theoretical physics" is.

http://www.physicsforums.com/blog.php?b=3727

Zz.
Nathew
#5
Apr14-13, 09:14 AM
P: 39
That does clear things up. Thank you.
However, the head of physics still said the program is more applied physics.

What did he mean by that then?
Vanadium 50
#6
Apr14-13, 09:52 AM
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Shouldn't you ask him what he meant by that?

This is very hard to answer, since you seem to have a misunderstanding of what theoretical physics is and not a very clear idea what applied physics is.
Nathew
#7
Apr14-13, 05:29 PM
P: 39
Quote Quote by Vanadium 50 View Post
Shouldn't you ask him what he meant by that?

This is very hard to answer, since you seem to have a misunderstanding of what theoretical physics is and not a very clear idea what applied physics is.
Yes, I should have. But I didn't. I don't know what you want me to do. It was more convenient for me to just ask here considering I only saw him briefly.

What was the point of your post?
ModusPwnd
#8
Apr14-13, 05:57 PM
P: 1,051
To me "applied" implies just that - emphasis on application. A "regular" physics degree is almost all theory. There is very little lab or application studied. Applied physics programs probably spend less time with Griffiths and more time in a lab. Less time on Boas and more time coding solutions. Thats what I would guess.

I think you could go into theory from an applied physics BS. Unless your program is starkly deficient in basic textbook theory... But that can be made up by you if you really want.
Vanadium 50
#9
Apr14-13, 06:55 PM
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Quote Quote by Nathew View Post
What was the point of your post?
To point out your question was sufficiently unclear as to preclude a useful answer. We need to be talking in a common language, and we are not. Look at the answer by ModusPwnd: he's trying to figure out what you mean.
ZapperZ
#10
Apr16-13, 07:23 AM
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Quote Quote by ModusPwnd View Post
To me "applied" implies just that - emphasis on application. A "regular" physics degree is almost all theory. There is very little lab or application studied. Applied physics programs probably spend less time with Griffiths and more time in a lab. Less time on Boas and more time coding solutions. Thats what I would guess.

I think you could go into theory from an applied physics BS. Unless your program is starkly deficient in basic textbook theory... But that can be made up by you if you really want.
This is incorrect, or at least in correct for most cases. Case in point: open journals such as Journal of Applied Physics. You'll see theoretical papers in there as well!

It has more to do with a historical notion of areas of physics that has an obvious "application". So condensed matter physics, accelerator physics, optics, atomic/molecular physics, etc. are considered to be "applied", whereas high energy physics, elementary particles, string/quantum gravity, etc. are often considered as to not be "applied".

Zz.
jtbell
#11
Apr16-13, 08:13 AM
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Quote Quote by ZapperZ View Post
So condensed matter physics, accelerator physics, optics, atomic/molecular physics, etc. are considered to be "applied", whereas high energy physics, elementary particles, string/quantum gravity, etc. are often considered as to not be "applied".
And note that all of these fields except string/QG have both theorists and experimentalists.
Nathew
#12
Apr16-13, 10:53 AM
P: 39
Okay. I think I have a better understanding now. Thank you guys!


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