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An electromagnetic question.

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clark84
#1
Nov26-13, 02:52 PM
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What are the three forces responsible for a neodymium magnet to fall slowly down through a heavy copper tube?
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Simon Bridge
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Nov26-13, 03:38 PM
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Welcome to PF;
That's a good question - what have you come up with so far?
i.e. have you listed the forces that are available to the universe? There are only four - but I feel the question may be treating one of them as two.
davenn
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Nov26-13, 03:55 PM
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Hi clark

its a good experiment, as Simon has said, have a think about what is happening
A hint ... a moving magnetic field and a conductor

also it could be any magnet and it works just as well with an aluminium tube

I use this action to produce dampening in a seismometer ( earthquake detector)
but rather than an aluminium tube, I use a moving strip of aluminium between 2 fixed magnets

Dave

clark84
#4
Nov26-13, 07:18 PM
P: 3
An electromagnetic question.

Quote Quote by Simon Bridge View Post
Welcome to PF;
That's a good question - what have you come up with so far?
i.e. have you listed the forces that are available to the universe? There are only four - but I feel the question may be treating one of them as two.
Well I can think of the two obvious, Gravity and Electromagnetic force.
Simon Bridge
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Nov27-13, 01:42 AM
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1. gravitation
2. electrical
3. magnetic

ruling out the strong and weak nuclear forces.

But - it may be that the question is thinking in terms of a free body diagram?
It really depends on where you are up to in your course.

Have you tried davenn's suggestion?
clark84
#6
Nov27-13, 11:44 AM
P: 3
Quote Quote by davenn View Post
Hi clark

its a good experiment, as Simon has said, have a think about what is happening
A hint ... a moving magnetic field and a conductor

also it could be any magnet and it works just as well with an aluminium tube

I use this action to produce dampening in a seismometer ( earthquake detector)
but rather than an aluminium tube, I use a moving strip of aluminium between 2 fixed magnets

Dave
I know that an electric current is generated when the magnet moves through the conductor. I looked it up and found something called "Eddy's Current" that i will need to look into so i can better understand exactly what occurs.
davenn
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Nov27-13, 02:47 PM
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Quote Quote by clark84 View Post
I know that an electric current is generated when the magnetic field moves through the conductor. I looked it up and found something called "Eddy's Current" that i will need to look into so i can better understand exactly what occurs.
That's a good start
Now think or research about what those eddy currents that are set up in the pipe do/cause


Dave

PS, note the little highlighted correction I did in your quoted text


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