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Are Slit Lamps Safe?

by beemast4
Tags: lamps, safe, slit
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beemast4
#1
Dec2-13, 02:11 PM
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At opticians they use slit lamps. Does anyone know if they are safe for the human eye (the light can be bright and annoying)? I'd imagine they'd have safety checks on that kind of stuff.

Anyone can answer?
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Drakkith
#2
Dec2-13, 06:44 PM
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Yes, it is safe. It's just a little bright.
sophiecentaur
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Dec3-13, 05:13 PM
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If you were outside in the Sun and not in the dim examining room, I bet you'd hardly be able to see that slit of light that looks so bright. Your eyes can adapt to an amazingly big range of light levels, given a few minute to adjust.
I think one of the reasons for using low light conditions for eye testing is that you pupil is open wide and gives you much less depth of field, this making the test more sensitive.

berkeman
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Dec3-13, 06:06 PM
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Are Slit Lamps Safe?

Quote Quote by sophiecentaur View Post
If you were outside in the Sun and not in the dim examining room, I bet you'd hardly be able to see that slit of light that looks so bright. Your eyes can adapt to an amazingly big range of light levels, given a few minute to adjust.
I think one of the reasons for using low light conditions for eye testing is that you pupil is open wide and gives you much less depth of field, this making the test more sensitive.
Actually, they will generally use eye drops to dilate your eyes for such exams. They do that primarily so they can see more of the retina.
sophiecentaur
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Dec4-13, 02:09 AM
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Eye drops are not used for regular eye testing ( not in Brighton UK). That includes the pressure test and view field. You don't want to see a test chart with eyes full of drops. The less invasive and more 'normal' the better.
berkeman
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Dec4-13, 12:10 PM
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Quote Quote by sophiecentaur View Post
Eye drops are not used for regular eye testing ( not in Brighton UK). That includes the pressure test and view field. You don't want to see a test chart with eyes full of drops. The less invasive and more 'normal' the better.
Here locally in the US they do the eye exam first, with the eye chart, etc., and then put in the dilating drops and have you sit around for 10-15 minute while your pupils dilate for the rest of the exam.
sophiecentaur
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Dec4-13, 12:28 PM
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Quote Quote by berkeman View Post
Here locally in the US they do the eye exam first, with the eye chart, etc., and then put in the dilating drops and have you sit around for 10-15 minute while your pupils dilate for the rest of the exam.
You wait till Obamacare kicks in. The optician will ask you to read the number plate on a car outside and stamp you as A1 fit.
The UK is somewhere in between. They do pretty much everything without drops, including looking at the retina. You may well find that it's not really necessary on 'your side' but they do it to justify charging you their fees. Is it snake oil in the dropper? lol.


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