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Digital Oscilloscope

by sophiecentaur
Tags: digital, oscilloscope
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sophiecentaur
#1
Jan3-14, 12:06 PM
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I am totally fed up with not having had the use of an oscilloscope for many years. It has been very frustrating on so many occasions. I need one.
So, my options are (and I only want to spend minimal cash, of course): An ancient eBay analogue scope for something around 100, a PC based one or a small, hand-held digital scope. Anything more desirable will cost too much.
Before I bid on a dodgy old analogue scope, can anyone give me an opinion about the Portable pocket sized 'Arm' style scopes?
Alternatively, is there a sampler which will interface with my iMac? I couldn't find anything that I could use without invoking Parallels (the PC emulator).
I would really appreciate some well informed answers. I'm sure several of you guys have been there too.
Cheers in advance.
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phinds
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Jan3-14, 01:15 PM
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I think a major consideration would be the relationship among these:
(1) what kind of response time do you need for what you do?
(2) what kind of response time is available on the analog scope ?
(3) what kind of response time is available on the digital scope ?

I suppose there are other considerations such as how high a voltage they can deal with but my concern was always with response times.
the_emi_guy
#3
Jan3-14, 03:26 PM
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A couple years ago a fooled around with this:

http://www.zeitnitz.de/Christian/scope_en

Very nice GUI, drives just like real scope, free, but, of course, limited to bandwidth of soundcard.

sophiecentaur
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Jan3-14, 03:45 PM
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Digital Oscilloscope

Quote Quote by the_emi_guy View Post
A couple years ago a fooled around with this:

http://www.zeitnitz.de/Christian/scope_en

Very nice GUI, drives just like real scope, free, but, of course, limited to bandwidth of soundcard.
Does it work on OS X? (As in my question.)

@phinds
I was after around 20MHz response as that seems to be the break point between cheap and not cheap. It also takes care of lots of home electronics stuff. I have no chance of working on GHz processor circuits - rather it would be audio / inverters / simple logic etc.
I really wanted to know about the downside of the little hand held jobs. Have you used one?
the_emi_guy
#5
Jan4-14, 12:20 AM
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[QUOTE=sophiecentaur;4619911]Does it work on OS X? (As in my question.)

Looks like OS X would be a problem.

I've never used the little Nano oscilloscopes but they look pretty amazing for the price. I would be worried that a single channel would be too limiting, and the multichannel ones are more expensive (but maybe still in your budget).

Hopefully someone who has one will chime in.
phinds
#6
Jan4-14, 12:48 AM
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Quote Quote by sophiecentaur View Post
Does it work on OS X? (As in my question.)

@phinds
I was after around 20MHz response as that seems to be the break point between cheap and not cheap. It also takes care of lots of home electronics stuff. I have no chance of working on GHz processor circuits - rather it would be audio / inverters / simple logic etc.
I really wanted to know about the downside of the little hand held jobs. Have you used one?
No, can't help you there. I only used big expensive lab ones. Never had one at home.
tfr000
#7
Jan4-14, 08:22 AM
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FWIW - in 30+ years in electronics, maybe 95% of oscilloscope work has been done single channel. but, when you need it, you need it.
vk6kro
#8
Jan5-14, 12:39 AM
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The workhorse of analog oscilloscopes has been the 20 MHz dual trace type.

You may not need dual trace, but it is an indication of a better type of device.

With the arrival of digital oscilloscopes, perfectly good analog types are available cheaply.

I have a 20 MHz oscilloscope which can give a stable sinewave from a 60 MHz input.

The portable $60 oscilloscopes have very small screens but 60 MHz bandwidth. So, maybe a bit difficult to use, but an amazing price.
Windadct
#9
Jan5-14, 01:21 PM
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Hello Sophie ... been looking at this pretty hard for while now. I have come across a couple good "deals" for older analog, but the general consensus is that the sellers rarely will certify the scope is 100% functional. There are guys selling reconditioned - and they will back the scope up - but at your price point that may be tough. So for the money I have pretty much given up on older used analog - but still possible.
The next best choice at that bandwith is the PC scopes, the Hantek types seem to have a pretty good reputation ( http://dx.com/p/hantek-6022be-2-ch-a...FUjxOgodhXYAGw )
I am looking for more like 200mHz Bandwith ( for power electronics) and need the scope to do a Lissajous (V-I curve trace) - so the low end DSOs ( $300-500 US) 2 channel can get me to 100mHz -- the 200 Mhz is tougher to find. - I would prefer the DSO to allow easier snapshots of switching events.


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