Register to reply

Alpha and proton decay

by majid313mirzae
Tags: alpha, decay, proton
Share this thread:
majid313mirzae
#1
Apr22-14, 05:48 AM
P: 3
All nuclei with A > 210 are alpha emitters, yet very few emit protons spontaneously.
Yet both decays lower the Coulomb energy of the nucleus. Why is
proton decay not more common?
Phys.Org News Partner Physics news on Phys.org
Researchers demonstrate ultra low-field nuclear magnetic resonance using Earth's magnetic field
Bubbling down: Discovery suggests surprising uses for common bubbles
New non-metallic metamaterial enables team to 'compress' and contain light
Vanadium 50
#2
Apr22-14, 07:00 AM
Mentor
Vanadium 50's Avatar
P: 16,317
Look at the binding energy curve.
mathman
#3
Apr22-14, 06:52 PM
Sci Advisor
P: 6,057
Quote Quote by majid313mirzae View Post
All nuclei with A > 210 are alpha emitters, yet very few emit protons spontaneously.
Yet both decays lower the Coulomb energy of the nucleus. Why is
proton decay not more common?
Some of these nuclei undergo beta decay, not alpha.

lpetrich
#4
Apr25-14, 04:04 PM
P: 530
Alpha and proton decay

The binding energy of alpha particles means more energy available to make the decay happen -- it happens by quantum-mechanical tunneling.

I could dig up the alpha decay rate if anyone is interested - it also works for protons.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Speed of proton and alpha particle Introductory Physics Homework 1
Proton beta plus decay -proton proton chain High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics 1
Alpha Decay Introductory Physics Homework 6
Kinetic energy of daughter nucleus and alpha particle from alpha decay Introductory Physics Homework 1
N-14 + alpha -> O-17 + proton Introductory Physics Homework 3