Register to reply

Can stainless/steel be used as electromagnet?

by dan020350
Tags: electromagnet, stainless or steel
Share this thread:
dan020350
#1
May4-14, 10:05 PM
P: 33
I know you can used iron wrapped around with copper coil to create electromagnet , can it be done with steel? Or must it always be iron?
Phys.Org News Partner Physics news on Phys.org
A new, tunable device for spintronics
Watching the structure of glass under pressure
New imaging technique shows how cocaine shuts down blood flow in mouse brains
Andrew Mason
#2
May4-14, 11:54 PM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
P: 6,679
Quote Quote by dan020350 View Post
I know you can used iron wrapped around with copper coil to create electromagnet , can it be done with steel? Or must it always be iron?
You can certainly create an electromagnet with a stainless steel core. You can create an electromagnet with a paper core. It is just that the strength of the magnetic field will not be as high as with a soft iron core. The reason is that the iron molecules in pure iron are like little bar magnets that can align with a magnetic field and thereby increase the magnetic field strength. Paper molecules are not like that. Stainless steel is not that good either because the nickel molecules create bonds with the iron molecules that prevent the iron molecules from moving and aligning with the magnetic field.

AM
dan020350
#3
May4-14, 11:55 PM
P: 33
Thanks

UltrafastPED
#4
May5-14, 01:57 AM
Sci Advisor
Thanks
PF Gold
UltrafastPED's Avatar
P: 1,908
Can stainless/steel be used as electromagnet?

For more depth see: "Why don't magnets work on some stainless steels?"
http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...gnets-work-on/
Chronos
#5
May5-14, 02:26 AM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
Chronos's Avatar
P: 9,445
Permanent magnets are still widely used to sort scrap metal.
AlephZero
#6
May5-14, 05:48 AM
Engineering
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
Thanks
P: 7,160
As the Scientific American article points out, there are two main types of stainless steel with different magnetic properties. Compared with iron, the magnetic effect is either small or non-existent.

The term "steel" covers a wide range of different alloys. "Electrical steel" has magnetic properties very similar to pure iron, and is used to make the laminations in transformer cores, etc.

Another issue is that most types of steel tend to become permanently magnetized, unlike iron. This is not very useful for an electromagnet, where you want the magnetic field to disappear when the current is switched off.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Copper and Stainless Steel Materials & Chemical Engineering 2
Friction of steel versus stainless steel General Physics 0
Stainless Steel Materials & Chemical Engineering 9
Which stainless steel? Materials & Chemical Engineering 3
Stainless Steel Chemistry 10