Register to reply

Car in motion

by stupidkid
Tags: motion
Share this thread:
stupidkid
#1
Jun25-05, 01:55 PM
P: 18
Im new here and I really dont know the standard sorry if this is too easy for you,
There is a car moving at constant speed and suddenly the driver applies the brakes. So everyone in the car moves forward. But as the car holts the people go forward. Why? With reasons.
I have a decent solution but I dont think its right.

I thought it this way........... imagine the brakes are a force opposing the motion of the car so due to the 1st law the people will go forward. But after that to achieve equilibrium the car goes backwards. Do you think the answer is right?
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
Physical constant is constant even in strong gravitational fields
Montreal VR headset team turns to crowdfunding for Totem
Researchers study vital 'on/off switches' that control when bacteria turn deadly
brewnog
#2
Jun25-05, 02:12 PM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
brewnog's Avatar
P: 2,793
People here won't just do your homework for you.

Post your answer, or any thoughts, and you'll get feedback!
Knavish
#3
Jun25-05, 08:14 PM
P: 110
I'm not exactly sure what you're saying, but I think you're close..

Find a connection between the first law and the passengers. What are they doing when the car freezes?

stupidkid
#4
Jun26-05, 03:59 AM
P: 18
Car in motion

they are moving forward when the car freezes...... how can that help? But I have noticed that the whole car moves backward when the car freezes. That means it is not related to the passengers. I think that when the brakes stop the car the car exert a force on the brakes so they displace and so to come back to their original position the exert force on the car which makes it move backward.
futb0l
#5
Jun26-05, 05:12 AM
P: 32
Newton's First Law. The passengers in the car travels with the velocity of the car, but when the car is stopped (by the braking force), the passengers keep going at the velocity of the car because there are no forces stopping it.
HallsofIvy
#6
Jun26-05, 07:12 AM
Math
Emeritus
Sci Advisor
Thanks
PF Gold
P: 39,691
Do you mean that the car moves backward relative to the people? Certainly putting the brakes on applies a force to the car, not directly to the people. The car will slow down, the people will not- until something in the car (seat belts, the dashboard, the windshield) applies a force to the people to slow them also. During that time, the people will move forward, hopefully not far, in the car and we might say that the car will appear to be moving backward to those people. Of course, relative to the ground, the car is still moving forward, only not as fast.
Danger
#7
Jun26-05, 11:06 AM
PF Gold
Danger's Avatar
P: 8,964
Quote Quote by HallsofIvy
Do you mean that the car moves backward relative to the people?
I'm wondering if he might mean the very slight rebound effect of the deformed tires and suspension system regaining their original shape after a panic stop...
brewnog
#8
Jun26-05, 11:43 AM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
brewnog's Avatar
P: 2,793
Quote Quote by Danger
I'm wondering if he might mean the very slight rebound effect of the deformed tires and suspension system regaining their original shape after a panic stop...
I think he might also be getting at the way that (say) a passenger's head will move forwards under braking, and then after the car has stopped, the passenger's head will move back. This is, of course, just down to the passenger returning to its normal seated position accompanying the restoration of balance of forces on the passenger.

Also, (and here I'm just making sure that the OP does understand), a car's brakes do not provide a 'backwards' force on the car, they provide a force in opposition to that of movement.
stupidkid
#9
Jun26-05, 02:08 PM
P: 18
hey,
danger understood me, thats what I mean, and the relative thing is not what I mean because the car does go backward as seen from an outside inertial frame slightly.
And Brewnog the passengers head do move back but because of the force of the brakes not the normal seating position.
And something else, brakes stop the tyres from moving so when the tyres stop suddenly they exert a force on the brakes (3rd law) so the brakes move from their initial position and try to come back(elasticity) which in turn exerts a force which I think is the possible answer
Knavish
#10
Jun26-05, 02:59 PM
P: 110
What are you talking about? I think futb0l gave you the right answer. Also, the backward motion might be the frame of the car realigning itself with the tires.
stupidkid
#11
Jun26-05, 03:18 PM
P: 18
what??? fytbol is talking about the jerk forward not backward. Which is not my question.
Gokul43201
#12
Jun26-05, 03:19 PM
Emeritus
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
Gokul43201's Avatar
P: 11,155
Just look at this whole thing in the original moving frame (of the car before brakes were applied). In this frame the action of the brakes is equivalent to a backward force on the seat, causing separation between the person's head/torso and the seatback. When the brakes stop acting (ie : car in in rest in the earth frame), this backward force is removed, and the person's head/torso return to the upright position only due to (i) the action of seatbelts, and (ii) the fact that this is the equilibrium/comfort position of the person....unless I'm missing something.

PS : Stupidkid, you have a typo in the OP. You say "forwards" when you mean "backwards" for the second jerk.
stupidkid
#13
Jun26-05, 03:33 PM
P: 18
hey gokul43201,
i dont think your answer is right because even if you dont have a seatbelt this happens
and the WHOLE car moves backward. did you understand?
PS: whats a "typo in the OP.
brewnog
#14
Jun26-05, 06:42 PM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
brewnog's Avatar
P: 2,793
Quote Quote by stupidkid
hey gokul43201,
i dont think your answer is right because even if you dont have a seatbelt this happens
and the WHOLE car moves backward. did you understand?
PS: whats a "typo in the OP.

Ok, I think I know what you're getting at now.

The person will move back because that is how the human body naturally rests in such a seat, under equilibrium conditions. If I pulled you up out of a chair, and then let go, you'd return to the chair. The passenger is simply returning to its equilibrium condition, much like pushing a pendulum and it returning to its lowest position.

I don't know about you, but when I apply the brakes from travelling forwards in my car, I don't end up going backwards. There may be a slight rebound effect, as Danger (?) mentioned, caused by the elasticity in the tyres, and any slack in the suspension linkages.
brewnog
#15
Jun26-05, 06:45 PM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
brewnog's Avatar
P: 2,793
Ok, I've got it.

Quote Quote by stupidkid
And Brewnog the passengers head do move back but because of the force of the brakes not the normal seating position.
If you crash into a wall, the passengers' heads will move forwards at first (you understand this, Newton's First Law). They'll then move backwards again. It IS because of the natural resting position of the human in its seated position. The force pulling the heads (and torsos!) back is done by the human body (and slightly by inertia-reel seatbelts). There is no other external force pushing the people back into their seats, assuming the car eventually comes to rest.
stupidkid
#16
Jun27-05, 02:03 AM
P: 18
you all are saying stuff about natural positions and all blahblahblah but I think the answer lies somewhere in the displacement of the brakes because when this happens the force backward is quite alot when braking suddenly. That force cannot be due to any natural head position. It is found that the WHOLE CAR MOVES BACKWARD. so how can that be due to naturalblahblhal blah.
brewnog
#17
Jun27-05, 06:07 AM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
brewnog's Avatar
P: 2,793
Quote Quote by stupidkid
you all are saying stuff about natural positions and all blahblahblah but I think the answer lies somewhere in the displacement of the brakes because when this happens the force backward is quite alot when braking suddenly. That force cannot be due to any natural head position. It is found that the WHOLE CAR MOVES BACKWARD. so how can that be due to naturalblahblhal blah.
The whole car does NOT move backward considerably. Any (small, perhaps a couple of millimeters) backwards movement once the car has come to a halt is due, as you have been told several times by several members, to the elastic nature of the tyres, and possibly some slack in the suspension mechanisms.

If you don't believe us, perhaps you'd care to explain how a braking system would cause motion of the car in the backwards direction.
stupidkid
#18
Jun27-05, 11:32 AM
P: 18
EXPLANATION
Lets say that the brakes apply a force on the tyres to stop them. NOW due to NEWTONS 3rd LAW there will be a force on the brakes. So by a small quantity the brakes will move, now considering that they dont brake the elastic limit they have to come back to their original position. And hence they exert a force on the car which makes the WHOLE car MOVE BACKWARD.
If anyone has a different answer to this pls post.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Uniform Circular Motion, Rotational Motion, Torque, and Inertia General Physics 1
Classical Mechanics, Motion under Gravity, Motion on Inclines Physics Learning Materials 0
Important find:when is the light wave-motion ?and when is particle-motion? Special & General Relativity 5
Uniform Circualr Motion with Projectile Motion problem (Extremely confusing): Introductory Physics Homework 4