Why no beta-stable isotopes at N=19,21..?


by Rade
Tags: betastable, isotopes
Rade
#1
Jul12-05, 10:32 PM
P: n/a
Hello to all,

I am new to this forum. I am webmaster for the Nucleon Cluster Model of the atomic nucleus of the late nuclear physicist Ronald Brightsen (MIT, 1950). You may view the site at this link: http://www.brightsenmodel.phoenixrising-web.net

In his papers Mr. Brightsen asked the following question: Why are no beta-stable isotopes found at neutron numbers N = 19,21,35,39,45,61,71,89,112,123,147. Do any current "models" of nuclear physics provide an answer ? Thanks for any help you can provide.
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