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Astronomy events schedule

by Phobos
Tags: astronomy, events, schedule
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chemisttree
#145
Nov12-07, 12:49 PM
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I have a small refractor and a small 4.5" reflector so my experience wouldn't be of much use to you. I would guess that 45 minutes would be more than enough time to cool the telescope down enough for this purpose. Russ or Chronos would have better info for you, I think.

If the telescope hasn't cooled sufficiently, you would see that with the star test. And you probably shouldn't try to recollimate a telescope that isn't at thermal equilibrium.
Saladsamurai
#146
Nov12-07, 01:22 PM
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Quote Quote by chemisttree View Post
I have a small refractor and a small 4.5" reflector so my experience wouldn't be of much use to you. I would guess that 45 minutes would be more than enough time to cool the telescope down enough for this purpose. Russ or Chronos would have better info for you, I think.

If the telescope hasn't cooled sufficiently, you would see that with the star test. And you probably shouldn't try to recollimate a telescope that isn't at thermal equilibrium.
Point taken. I'll give it a good hour before I try the comet again tonight.

Thanks chemistree,
Casey
Astronuc
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Jan26-08, 08:08 AM
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for these final days of January and the first days of February will be an exceptional time for predawn sky watchers with a beautiful pairing of the two brightest planets, Venus and Jupiter. They will appear closest together in the dawn sky of Friday, Feb. 1, and a few mornings later, the waning crescent moon will later drop by to join them.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/space/200801...iterandthemoon
russ_watters
#148
Jan26-08, 09:16 AM
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Quote Quote by Saladsamurai View Post
I am pretty sure that I got this comet in my view tonight...but I couldn't get much more than a "greyish fuzzball"....

Out of curiosity, how long does an 8" Newtonian need to cool to ambient temp. it was about 26 degrees F tonight. I wonder if that is why I couldn't see it so great?

Casey
Sorry I missed this before (I rarely check this thread). A "greyish fuzzball" is all the comet is. And in a telescope, even at low power, it covered most or all of the field of view. Here's a picture I took of it through my lower power/wider field of view telescope:

http://www.russsscope.net/images/Holmes.jpg

It looked about the same through the eyepiece (not quite as bright or well defined, though).
Saladsamurai
#149
Jan26-08, 12:15 PM
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Nice. Thanks russ. Hey, I just noticed nuc's post about venus and jupiter. I would like to check it out, but I have been reluctant to go out since its freezing in Boston area as of late.

I was just wondering, is there any kind of damage that can occur to my scope due to sub-freezing temperatures? I know I would have to leave it outside for some time to cool the mirror. If not, is there anything to look out for? Like when I bring it back inside to the warmth. Do things get dewey or anything like that?
russ_watters
#150
Jan26-08, 12:58 PM
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Dew is the thing you have to worry about most. Make sure you put the lens caps (don't forger the one on the eyepiece socket) before bringing it inside. It can also be a problem in spring and fall if you leave the scope out all night - it could be dripping wet in the morning.

For actually using it, the cold can make grease more viscous and can play games with the electronics, but neither of these cause permanent damage.
Saladsamurai
#151
Jan26-08, 01:02 PM
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Cool. There are no electronics, so that is a bonus!
Saladsamurai
#152
Feb20-08, 02:14 PM
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I heard there is a partial lunar eclipse tonight. I am going to Google around now to find the details.


EDIT It's a total eclipse. . . here is the link
http://sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclips...2008Feb21.html
NLocke
#153
Mar11-08, 12:26 PM
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This years national dark sky week is March 29 to April 4.
To find out more about National Dark Sky Week, visit http://ndsw.org/
Saladsamurai
#154
Mar16-08, 10:28 AM
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Moon will occult Pleiades on April 8th, 2008. I am not sure who this will be viewable to. Anyone know?
neutrino
#155
Mar16-08, 10:59 AM
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Quote Quote by Saladsamurai View Post
Moon will occult Pleiades on April 8th, 2008. I am not sure who this will be viewable to. Anyone know?
Have an eye out for alerts from this site, or you could run their software.
Saladsamurai
#156
Mar16-08, 01:41 PM
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Quote Quote by neutrino View Post
Have an eye out for alerts from this site, or you could run their software.
I can't get this page to load. Also, I can't seem to see a section for US...only Europe?
russ_watters
#157
Mar16-08, 02:09 PM
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Looks like it won't be visible from the Eastern US. It's tough: the moon is near new and it starts right around at moonset for the eastern US. For the west, you get a couple of hours of it, but the view from Starry Night says that it won't be occulting any of the major stars - it's just a close pass.
Saladsamurai
#158
Mar17-08, 12:12 AM
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Quote Quote by russ_watters View Post
Looks like it won't be visible from the Eastern US. It's tough: the moon is near new and it starts right around at moonset for the eastern US. For the west, you get a couple of hours of it, but the view from Starry Night says that it won't be occulting any of the major stars - it's just a close pass.
Really? Damn. The article I read in Sky at Night said it was gone going to be all bad-***. Like a nice sliver of the moon. Damn.
George Jones
#159
Mar21-08, 06:40 PM
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Quote Quote by russ_watters View Post
Looks like it won't be visible from the Eastern US. It's tough: the moon is near new and it starts right around at moonset for the eastern US. For the west, you get a couple of hours of it, but the view from Starry Night says that it won't be occulting any of the major stars - it's just a close pass.
Take a look at Sault Ste. Marie and Fargo.
Saladsamurai
#160
May28-08, 11:57 AM
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Anything good going on that anyone knows of?
vincentm
#161
Jul25-08, 06:12 PM
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LIGO's Sample the Sky event.
isly ilwott
#162
Aug25-08, 09:33 AM
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I got this from a friend by email. Is there truth to it?



Two moons on August 27th what the Whole World is waiting for............. Planet Mars will be the brightest in the night sky starting August. It will look as large as the full moon to the naked eye. This will Cultivate on August 27 when Mars comes within 34.65M miles of earth. Be sure to watch the sky on Aug. 27 12:30 am. It will look like the earth has 2 moons. The next time Mars may come this close is in 2287. Share this with your friends as NO ONE ALIVE TODAY will ever see it Again.


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