Two Inch Grass - Possible?


by J-Man
Tags: grass, inch
J-Man
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#1
Apr9-03, 12:27 AM
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How hard would it be to either breed or genetically modify grass so that it only grows about 2 inches (4 or 5 cm) tall? Is this feasable? What is required? How long could we expect it to take? Is it likely the grass would stay healthy? Would the seeds be likely to form and then grow successfully?
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Another God
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#2
Apr9-03, 06:04 AM
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I would imagine, from a semi-uneducated position, that such a thing is not only possible, but probably not far off in the future. In fact, I think something like it has already been created.

If I remember correctly, I did hear about a grass, which, well, it didn't have a defined length, but it did grow a lot slower, so you only needed to mow it once every few months or so.

but in theory, it makes completely perfect sense that you should be able to make a grass which grows to a particular length and no more. at first it would be an average length (ie: all grass is 'about' 1 inch long or so), and then as it is refined, they will be able to make them all grow exactly to a particular height. And then the lawn would also look incredibly neat without any effort...
BoulderHead
#3
Apr9-03, 08:08 AM
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I thought there already existed certain types of grass which never grew beyond a few inches?

Njorl
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#4
Apr9-03, 08:26 AM
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Two Inch Grass - Possible?


MOSS - the lawn of the future.

http://www.deerfencedirect.com/mossbook.php3

Njorl
J-Man
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#5
Apr9-03, 02:39 PM
P: 202
I thought I remembered hearing about "short grass" that had been produced in the past, but I wasn't sure.
I would think that in order to get people to buy and use it, it would have to be similar in appearance to the popular grasses already used for lawns/parks, i.e. Kentucky Blue Grass and other similar breeds. It seems like it would be so beneficial, economically, environmentally and asthetically. I have to wonder why more people haven't been discussing and/or experimenting with it.

I too thought of moss as a replacement. I think I would love it, but I'm not sure others would jump on that bandwagon. I also think some breeds of clover would make a good replacement. When I lived in Troy, Michigan about half my backyard was the clover that makes purple flowers. It was beautiful, smelled nice and didn't grow too high.

Any other thoughts, opinions, facts on this subject?
GlamGein
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#6
Apr9-03, 11:44 PM
P: 65
I am sure it is possible to breed grass that doesn't grow past a certain length. I am not a botanist, but I would guess it would take only some chromosome to code for how tall it should be, and some growth hormone (do plants even use horomones...).
Another God
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#7
Apr10-03, 04:58 AM
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I would love to have Moss as a lawn, its just unfortunate that I can't imagine it being practical.

The Moss which covers much of the landscape along sections of the Overland Trail in Tasmania is so thick, that when you walk on it, its kinda like walking on a mattress. Its so soft and cushy that I actually had the nerve to drop my pack and try to do a Back summersault on the side of a walking track. Its like a field of Crash Mats...

The problem that seems obvious from moss though, are two fold. Firstly its too wet. It needs a lot of water, and then anything which touches it gets wet. If the moss is exposed to a lot of sunlight, it won't live.

Secondly, I don't think any moss can handle being walked all over that same way that grasses can. It is quite clear that grasses have evolved to be trampled on all their lives by large creatures. Moss on the other hand has evolved to cling to trees, and hang around under low lying shrubberies where nothing but birds etc can get too....


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