How High Do Mosquitoese fly?


by Mk
Tags: mosquitoese
Mk
Mk is offline
#1
Nov5-05, 06:01 AM
P: 2,057
How high do mosquitoes fly? How high do flies fly? From the ground I mean.

I read a source that said mosquitoes tend to bite people less than 25 feet up. That was the American Mosquito Control Association or something like that. Flies the same?
Phys.Org News Partner Biology news on Phys.org
Citizen scientists match research tool when counting sharks
Microbes provide insights into evolution of human language
First sex determining genes appeared in mammals 180 million years ago
russ_watters
russ_watters is online now
#2
Nov5-05, 09:49 AM
Mentor
P: 22,008
On purpose, yeah, but I heard once that every now and then a storm will inject some insects into the stratosphere.

Dunno about that 25 feet thing, though.
Moonbear
Moonbear is offline
#3
Nov5-05, 02:11 PM
Emeritus
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
Moonbear's Avatar
P: 12,257
Oh, about 20,000 feet...when one sneaks onto a plane.

Okay, now where did my "more than you ever wanted to know about mosquitoes" link go? Oh, here it is: http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~insects/mosbiol.htm

Shoot! I don't see anything about how high they fly. They don't seem to have any sort of mosquito myths page either. I don't know how high they can fly, but since mosquitoes tend to swarm around water and moist locations, it sounds fairly reasonable that most people are bitten while near the ground.

Genecks
Genecks is offline
#4
Nov5-05, 08:46 PM
P: 150

How High Do Mosquitoese fly?


Perhaps like bees they only fly high to mate, otherwise I would go with moonbear on the idea that they stay low to ground based on the fact there is blood down there.
russ_watters
russ_watters is online now
#5
Nov5-05, 11:43 PM
Mentor
P: 22,008
Quote Quote by Moonbear
I don't know how high they can fly, but since mosquitoes tend to swarm around water and moist locations, it sounds fairly reasonable that most people are bitten while near the ground.
Well, there is that, plus the fact that not a whole lot of people can fly more than 25 feet above the ground (personally, I've made it up to 80 feet, but my arms get tired pretty quick).
Moonbear
Moonbear is offline
#6
Nov6-05, 02:01 AM
Emeritus
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
Moonbear's Avatar
P: 12,257
Quote Quote by russ_watters
Well, there is that, plus the fact that not a whole lot of people can fly more than 25 feet above the ground (personally, I've made it up to 80 feet, but my arms get tired pretty quick).
I was thinking more about high rise buildings. I've heard something similar before about mosquitoes not flying above the 3rd floor of buildings, and am pretty sure it was myth, but don't have anything to support or refute it.
Ouabache
Ouabache is offline
#7
Nov6-05, 06:59 PM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
P: 1,327
I liked the bit about the mosquito sneaking onto a plane going up 20,000 feet

But more seriously, here is a quote from the AMCA site.
"Mosquitoes that bite humans prefer to fly at heights of less than 25 ft. Asian Tiger Mosquitoes have been found breeding in treeholes over 40 feet above ground. In Singapore, they have been found in apartments 21 stories above ground. Mosquitoes have been found breeding up to 14,000 feet in the Himalayas and 2000 feet underground in mines in India." ref (The American Mosquito Control Association)
Greg Bernhardt
Greg Bernhardt is offline
#8
Nov11-05, 12:57 AM
Admin
Greg Bernhardt's Avatar
P: 8,542
Quote Quote by Mk
How high do mosquitoes fly? How high do flies fly? From the ground I mean.
I read a source that said mosquitoes tend to bite people less than 25 feet up. That was the American Mosquito Control Association or something like that. Flies the same?
Well I have a buddy that has an apt on the 20th level and there have been Mosquitos on the balcony
Reshma
Reshma is offline
#9
Nov11-05, 07:55 AM
P: 777
Quote Quote by Greg Bernhardt
Well I have a buddy that has an apt on the 20th level and there have been Mosquitos on the balcony
They probably took the elevator!!
Mk
Mk is offline
#10
Nov14-05, 05:00 AM
P: 2,057
Quote Quote by Greg Bernhardt
Well I have a buddy that has an apt on the 20th level and there have been Mosquitos on the balcony
One of the retarded mosquitos probably got up there and laid eggs in his "Effect of sunlight on water" experiments.
ssqware
ssqware is offline
#11
Jan20-06, 05:34 AM
P: 3
Check out this link for a good argument on the subject.

http://www2.hawaii.edu/~sakae/canmosquitoesflyhigh.htm
x-treme
x-treme is offline
#12
Jan25-06, 05:20 PM
P: 5
anopheles,the vector of malaria goes up to 500 m...no malaria case is seen over this height...i heard this during a lesson!
ssqware
ssqware is offline
#13
Jan25-06, 07:13 PM
P: 3
yes, but just because they don't happen to be in high places it doesn't mean they can't get there. Observance and capability are two different things. I suggest you check out this to settle the argument. MOSQUITOES CAN FLY HIGH!
Mk
Mk is offline
#14
Jan26-06, 03:49 AM
P: 2,057
Couldn't we just keep lowering the pressure in a contained space until all the mosquitoes can't fly? Then that would definitely be the upper limit.
vanesch
vanesch is offline
#15
Jan26-06, 04:00 AM
Emeritus
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
P: 6,238
Quote Quote by Moonbear
I've heard something similar before about mosquitoes not flying above the 3rd floor of buildings, and am pretty sure it was myth, but don't have anything to support or refute it.
This is definitely not true. I live on the 10th floor and we regularly have mosquitos. Maybe this is due because behind the building where I have my appartment, a mountain raises (I'm facing a high-sloped forest at the back), but the horizontal distance to the side of the mountain is bigger than the direct distance to the floor (the height).
rachmaninoff
#16
Jan26-06, 04:36 AM
P: n/a
Quote Quote by ssqware
Check out this link for a good argument on the subject.

http://www2.hawaii.edu/~sakae/canmosquitoesflyhigh.htm

yes, but just because they don't happen to be in high places it doesn't mean they can't get there. Observance and capability are two different things. I suggest you check out this to settle the argument. MOSQUITOES CAN FLY HIGH!
That's an awful link with poorly-reasoned arguments and no useful information, in fact written by an undergraduate in business school.
Many claims of animal endurance seem beyond comprehension but actually can and do happen. Some television shows, such as Ripley's Believe it or Not, actually make a living by displaying such mind-blowing spectacles. If an ant can carry 100 times its body weight, a spider can make the strongest substance known to science and a monarch butterfly can span the pacific ocean during migration, then really, is it that difficult to believe that mosquitoes fly high?
Therefore, the summation of a mosquito's tiny vertical movements can eventually equal the distance needed to scale a tall building. Also supporting this claim is the fact that the force of gravity weakens at higher altitudes, thus making the mosquito's climb even easier.
rachmaninoff
#17
Jan26-06, 04:56 AM
P: n/a
From Malakooti et al, U. of Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland:

Unlike the parasite, the mosquito vector can
commonly be found at altitudes from >1,600 m
(3,4) to 3,000 m, demonstrating that the limiting
factor for malaria transmission at high altitude
is the survival of the Plasmodium parasite.
http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eid/vol4no.../malakooti.pdf
rachmaninoff
#18
Jan26-06, 05:01 AM
P: n/a
Even more relevant, this shows how high mosquitos fly relative to the ground below them (from an abstract by Kay, B.H. and Farrow, R.A., published in J. of Medical Entomology):

To investigate whether this species disperses in this manner, mosquitoes were identified from 368 aerial kite trap collections operated at 50–310 m (altitude) at inland New South Wales between November 1979 to December 1984. Forty samples (9 during daylight and 31 at night) contained mosquitoes, of which 221 could be identified as Culex australicus Dobrotworsky & Drummond (58.8%), Culex annulirostris (21.3%), Anopheles annulipes Walker s.l. (10.4%), Aedes theobaldi (Taylor) (7.2%), Aedes rubrithorax (Macquart) (1.4%), and Aedes sagax (Skuse) (<0.9%).
http://www.bioone.org/bioone/?reques...e=06&page=0797


Register to reply

Related Discussions
why High frequancy cause high resistance General Physics 3
High Strength Steel with Corrosion Resistance and High Toughness Materials & Chemical Engineering 7
High voltage electromachinery - the key to absurdly high power to weight ratios? Mechanical Engineering 12
High school project to propel a toy rocket as high as possible General Physics 7
High strength fibers for high pressure tubes. Materials & Chemical Engineering 1