Search results

  1. J

    Gear Reducer Design

    I am sorry; I had just assumed you were designing a chain drive. Unfortunately, I don't have experience in the area in which you are working. A quick look through Shigley's suggests that the section titled "Force Analysis - Spur Gearing" may be useful to you.
  2. J

    Gear Reducer Design

    Look through the section titled Roller Chain (17-5 in my U.S. 9th edition). You already know the input speed and you should be able to figure out the system's horsepower. At this point you can find a suitable ANSI chain number from the Tabulated Horsepower Table (Table 17-20 in my edition)...
  3. J

    Gear Reducer Design

    As SteamKing implied, there is no quick and easy answer to your newest question. You'll need to read some tutorials or get your hands on some books. I learned from "Shigley's Mechanical Engineering". To give you a direction, you'll first need to know the power requirements, torque loads...
  4. J

    Gear Reducer Design

    The gear ratio is equal to the inverse of the speed ratio: \frac{Tooth Count 1}{Tooth Count 2} =\frac{Speed 2}{Speed 1} This can be rewritten in any number of fashions. For example: ToothCount1*Speed1 = ToothCount2*Speed2 Or, rearrange to solve for your unknown. In your case...
  5. J

    Hydraulic tonnage question

    Looks like I was wrong, too...
  6. J

    Hydraulic tonnage question

    Wow, what a great question. I was completely convinced that I knew the answer until I started thinking about everyone else's reply. If you compress an object on one side with a force it will experience that force. If you add another force to the opposite side, the object will now...
  7. J

    Heavy duty door, automatically operated

    In the concept I described, the actuator would need to be mounted with brackets like those used for screen door closers. A good place to look for available push/pull forces and stroke lengths is http://www.firgelliauto.com/" [Broken]. I've worked with them in the past and found them to be...
  8. J

    Heavy duty door, automatically operated

    Steve, I don't completely understand your concept. What I had envisioned looks like the attached image. The linear actuator will keep pulling/pushing for as long as a current is applied. The direction of the actuator (push/pull) is changed by swapping the voltage polarity which is usually...
  9. J

    Mechanics of Materials Explanation

    Hello porav05 and welcome to Physics Forums. Generally, new questions are asked by creating a new thread/topic. To ask a new question, go to the appropriate subject (for Mechanical Engineering questions use https://www.physicsforums.com/forumdisplay.php?f=101") and click on the "New Topic"...
  10. J

    Mechanics of Materials Explanation

    I happen to have the seventh edition of Hibbeler's Mechanics of Materials; it sounds like the example hasn't changed. One issue I have always had with Hibbeler (I've used three of his books) is that he tends to assume you're comfortable enough with previous material to not need it repeated...
  11. J

    Heavy duty door, automatically operated

    How about using a linear actuator to both open and close the door? Linear actuators have a good price to force ratio and would solve the problem of the door slamming shut.
Top