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    Steel bar bisected by event horizon

    Hi! There's got to be something wrong with the following method to take photographs of the area inside a supermassive black hole, but I can't figure it out. 1. Lower your spacecraft to just outside the event horizon. 2. Extend a uniform steel bar with cameras embedded in it through...
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    Superman's Helicopter

    Another thing to keep in mind is the fact that the "signal" that the rod is being spun has to propagate down the length of the rod. There are actually two things to keep in mind here: the speed that the end of the rod is moving at and the speed at which the signal is propagating down the end of...
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    Superman's Helicopter

    Hi! I'm sure this has been done before, but here goes. Superman is flying through the vacuum of space and stumbles across a rod 100,000 kilometers long. This rod is of nonzero mass and is narrow enough for him to hold in his hand. It is infinitely rigid, with an infinitely high shear...
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    Possible method to escape a black hole?

    I don't think the rocket's acceleration is going to help -- it's still going to be going downwards because it would have to be moving at c to stay put at the event horizon. It can burn the engine as long as it wants but it will still fall downwards. The scenario I have is based on the fact...
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    Possible method to escape a black hole?

    What's wrong with the following method of escaping from inside an event horizon (and possibly exploring physics inside it?) 1. A rocket with a very strong engine slips below the event horizon -- just barely. 2. Fire the rocket engine so it would travel at c-epsilon were it not for the...
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    Experiences of particles moving at relativistic speeds in non-vacuum

    The ultimate speed limit is in fact c, I agree, but that brings back the first question: if it's possible for a rocketship to travel in excess of c* but by necessity less than c, what would the astronauts see when they looked out the window? Come to think of it, could a 0.9999c-max ship...
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    Experiences of particles moving at relativistic speeds in non-vacuum

    Hmm...I never thought of that. But the phase transition part...I'm now starting to wonder what happens if the electron (or neutron so you don't need to worry about charges and stuff) starts decelerating as it interacts with the medium (or because of the increased mass of attaching the TV camera...
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    Experiences of particles moving at relativistic speeds in non-vacuum

    I've probably got something wrong here, but bear with me. An electron is moving through a material faster than the speed of light in that material. I know particles tend to do this from time to time -- we have Cerenkov radiation. If a TV camera were attached to this electron in a way...
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