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    I Something I don't understand about a simple tension problem

    I am thinking about levers, like you mentioned, and how simple torque formulas show how force is in fact multiplied, but I am having trouble understanding how that works. There is something really nonintuitive going on here for me, or at least an aspect of the nature of force that I am...
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    I Something I don't understand about a simple tension problem

    Thanks, it is helping me to think of other examples where the applied force becomes multiplied, like with pulleys and levers. Torque seems to be what's causing the force to be multiplied. I only got my first-year of physics in university, so I do not know how to "follow" the force to the point...
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    I Something I don't understand about a simple tension problem

    But what causes the normal force? [edit] We know that gravity causes Fg, the vertical component.
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    I Something I don't understand about a simple tension problem

    I am not arguing against the answer. My concern is how does Fg go from a vertical force to a vertical force and a horizontal force which is a force vector greater than Fg? It is not making sense at all.
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    I Something I don't understand about a simple tension problem

    I knew the diagram for this. My issue is that the normal force seems to come from nowhere. The only applied force that I can identify is gravity. Where did the force that is causing the normal force come from?
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    I Question Regarding Continuity

    Right but he/she then put, "not continuous if c=1". It's almost like the marker quit reading past the 2nd step. This was meant for verty
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    I Question Regarding Continuity

    Wait a minute, the marker is totally wrong. The question says "for all real numbers". Not allowing f(1) is not allowing for all real numbers. I would argue this.
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    I Something I don't understand about a simple tension problem

    I assume that there is a normal force x acting on the ball from the wall horizontally. And of course there is a positive vertical -y force reacting to the negative gravitational force y. For the life of me I cannot make sense of where this normal force is coming from (granted I know it is the...
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    I Something I don't understand about a simple tension problem

    Imagine a tall block of wood sitting on the ground. Then imagine a rope resting on the block with both ends dangling off both sides of the block. Then someone attaches a ball to both ends of the rope. Assume the balls are equal in mass, thus the system is in equilibrium. Now the middle of...
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    I Why is an improbable early universe unacceptable?

    The probability of the particles that make up my textbook was very low in coming together to form my textbook. It's not surprizing because I am thinking about it after it happened. I still don't see why we are treating our position in the phase space any differently.
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    I Why is an improbable early universe unacceptable?

    My confusion is about why it's a coincidence in the first place. I don't understand why we should be surprised about something that we question the probability of after the fact. It's like if humans were floating in nothingness and hoping for this universe, then the only possible universe for...
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    I Why is an improbable early universe unacceptable?

    It's almost like they are saying that our universe is intrinsically special. But it's really just subjectively special to us because we
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    I Why is an improbable early universe unacceptable?

    A major problem for cosmology is to understand how random quantum fluctuations began in such an ordered state, namely the Big Bang. But the probability of such a low entropy state is wayyyyy too small. We should be minds/brains that appeared just now, a second ago, hours ago etc where there is...
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    I Why is an improbable early universe unacceptable?

    From what I understand about the multiverse is that enough time has passed for a quantum fluctuation so rare that it had formed the beginning of this universe which resulted in what it has become today and will be in the future. Of all of the possible quantum fluctuations, ours is one of the...
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    I Why is an improbable early universe unacceptable?

    Crap, I just noticed the cosmology section. sorry
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    I Why is an improbable early universe unacceptable?

    We already observed it; it's too late to say it is too improbable. A particle from a star that exploded billions of years ago just went into my glass of water. But, if we ask the question before our sun blows up if a specific particle from it will land on the highest point of a planet 50 light...
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    I Where does the force come from?

    But the electrons of the atoms in the string form relatively strong covalent bonds unlike the repulsive behavior of the electrons between the ball and wall. This, for some reason, is never stressed in the first-year physics courses that I have taken, yet they always make sure to explain that...
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    I Where does the force come from?

    Yeah, I was just confused about where the normal force was coming from; the only thing that makes sense is that it is the intermolecular forces. Assuming there are 4 natural forces EM, weak, strong, Fg, where only two of which are the most relevant in this problem EM force and Fg, I can only...
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    I Where does the force come from?

    I think I figured it out. Like Avicarto says, it's the normal force that brings in the horizontal component, but where does this normal force come from? We know that gravity is caused by mass as force particles (gravitons) or space-time curvature. So the source of this horizontal normal force...
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    I Where does the force come from?

    Thank-you very much for this visual. It helps me see how the theory works.
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    I Where does the force come from?

    Yes, but at least I could trace the source. That's just where my intuition is leading me.
  22. S

    I Where does the force come from?

    Yeah, but the tension actually exceeds g. It's driving me crazy.
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    I Where does the force come from?

    Okay, but where is this "extra" horizontal force coming from?
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    I Where does the force come from?

    It's just weird that the magnitude of the force of tension surpasses Fg, which is the only thing causing the force in the first place. It is like there is a free amount of force somewhere. Doesn't there have to be an input of force somewhere at some time in this system for tension to exceed Fg?
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    I Where does the force come from?

    But Fn doesn't vanish with finite values for the u and Ff. And why would this scenario need friction?
  26. S

    I Where does the force come from?

    Okay, then let's just assume that there is no friction between the ball and the wall as it comes into the maximum gravitational field.
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    I Where does the force come from?

    Yeah, the cm of the ball is one radian from the wall which causes a 30 degree angle with the vertical wall.
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    I Where does the force come from?

    So I am thinking about a question I had years ago in physics (this is just a question, not for homework). The question was to find the tension on a string that comes out from a vertical wall as a 2kg ball hangs from it at an angle, say 30o, from the wall. Just imagine a basketball hanging by a...
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    This dog seems to want to sing, why?

    It even sounds like he is trying to talk sometimes.
  30. S

    This dog seems to want to sing, why?

    This is a video taken by my nephew and his dog. I was never sure I believed the other YouTube videos like this until I actually witnessed it. We had a discussion about why the dog seemed to want to take part in the singing. Does anyone have any ideas?
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