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  1. C

    Doubt about an RLC circuit

    Thanks again, the associations of impedances if I understand them correctly, and I know how to get to the expression that I have left above, the problem is that when calculating the module of the impedance, and deriving, the expressions that remain on very very long and ugly, and it is...
  2. C

    Doubt about an RLC circuit

    Hello, I have been thinking about this problem for a few hours, and I do not understand how I should proceed to solve it correctly. Section a is very simple, just substitute in the expression that gives us the values of L and C that the statement gives us. However, when I get to section b, I...
  3. C

    Streamlines from a complex potential

    I've been trying this problem for a long time. By operating the lower part of the logarithm and clapping the real and imaginary part of the logarithm, I have come to the conclusion that the correct lines must be those in which it is true that: $ d \ frac {(x ^ 2 + y ^ 2-a ^ 2) ^ 2 + 4y ^ 2a ^...
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    Potential vector (A) of a disk with a surface current

    Hi, I've been stuck for a long time with this exercise. I am not able to calculate the potential vector, since I do not know very well how to pose the itegral, or how to decompose the disk to facilitate the resolution of the problem. I know that because the potential vector must be parallel to...
  5. C

    I Does the resistance of a material vary when introduced into water?

    I am preparing a small experimental project for the university on the influence of temperature on the resistivity of metals, and I have seen that one of the possible ways of measuring it is by introducing the material into water and increasing the temperature, but I have not just seen very clear...
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    I Does the resistance of a material vary when introduced into water?

    Suppose we have a copper wire, of resistance R, and we introduce it in water, when applying now a certain potential difference between the two ends, will the intensity that circulates through the wire be the same, and therefore also the resistance ?, is there going to be a potential drop due to...
  7. C

    I Doubt about the 1st Law of Maxwell

    Yes, I agree that I should give zero, what happens is that calculating the divergence of the field (from the expressions I left above), does not give zero ...
  8. C

    I Doubt about the 1st Law of Maxwell

    Okay, but still ... at points outside the disk, the surface charge density is zero, but according to my calculations the divergence of E is not ...
  9. C

    I Doubt about the 1st Law of Maxwell

    The electric field due to a disk of radius R on the z axis is: And its divergence will be: That evaluated at a point other than z = 0 is not necessarily zero, I know there has to be an error in my reasoning but I am not able to find it.
  10. C

    I Doubt about the 1st Law of Maxwell

    Good afternoon, My question concerns Maxwell's first law. Knowing the formula of the electric field created by a uniformly charged disk, we calculate its divergence and evaluate it at one point, it does not give us zero, as it should be because the volumetric density of charge is zero, why does...
  11. C

    Trapezoid method converges faster than the Simpson method

    Okay, thanks, I knew these formulas, what happens is that since you have to integrate between 0 and 2π and in 2π the second and fourth derivatives diverge, it is difficult to get the maximum error level ... And is there any explanation why, in this particular case, the trapezoid method...
  12. C

    Trapezoid method converges faster than the Simpson method

    Okay, thanks, and this phenomenon, why does it happen? I've been searching on several websites but I don't understand very well ...
  13. C

    Trapezoid method converges faster than the Simpson method

    Good Morning, I have been doing computer practices in C ++, and for an integration practice, the trapezoid method converges faster than the Simpson method. The function to be integrated is a first class elliptical integral of the form: Where k is bounded between [0,1). I have been thinking...
  14. C

    I Tension force in a spring

    But... how do you apply Newton's Third Law to this system??
  15. C

    I Tension force in a spring

    Yes, thank you, I understand that measure the reaction force, it is something logical by the way in which the sensor was placed, what I cannot understand from a physical point of view is the reason why this force is the same but in the opposite direction to Hooke's Law
  16. C

    I Tension force in a spring

    Thanks again, the mass of the pier is not zero, but if it is very small compared to the masses that are placed on the pier, I still don't quite understand the reason why the force exerted by the spring on the surface is equal to the restoring force given by Hooke's Law, but in the opposite...
  17. C

    I Tension force in a spring

    Okay, thank you very much, I think I understand something better now, what I have not seen is the reason why the forces have to balance, after all the lower part of the pier if it is suffering an acceleration .. . Is the diagram that I attached with the value of the different forces correct?
  18. C

    Doubts about the method of determining the elastic constant of a spring

    Yes, from my point of view, both methods are valid as long as the measurements are made in a rigorous and precise way, perhaps, I would be more inclined to the dynamic method, since with a computer data collection system it is much more precise determine the period of the oscillations that the...
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    Doubts about the method of determining the elastic constant of a spring

    Yes, I understand the representation of 1/ω^2 vs m (I think the intersection would be in m_0 / k), but the script asks me to represent ω^2 vs 1/m, and it is that graph to which I don't find such a clear physical meaning ... By the way, in your opinion, which method is more precise, static or...
  20. C

    I Tension force in a spring

    Thanks again, the sensor mediates the force exerted by the spring on the suspension. If we think about it slowly, it makes sense that this force goes in the opposite direction than the restoring force given by Hooke's Law, but I don't know very well how to explain it from a formal point of view...
  21. C

    I Tension force in a spring

    In both ways, I studied both the static and the dynamic method, in both cases the same thing happened, the force determined by the sensor was in the same direction as the elongation ...
  22. C

    I Tension force in a spring

    The question is that the only equation I can think of is Hooke's Law, but I don't understand why the force that reads the sensor is exactly the same as the restoring force but in the opposite direction (as the sensor is at the point of contact of the spring with the surface, this must be the...
  23. C

    I Tension force in a spring

    Thanks for your answer, What I mean by restoring force is the force given by Hooke's Law, in the system we are studying, that force would be given in the opposite direction to elongation, what I don't understand very well is the force that has to It appears at the point of contact between the...
  24. C

    I Tension force in a spring

    Good afternoon, I have some doubts about the tension force suffered by a spring to which a mass is hung and which is making a simple vertical armoin movement. My doubt lies in the fact that at the bottom of the pier (where the mass hangs), the spring exerts the restoring force that is given by...
  25. C

    Doubts about the method of determining the elastic constant of a spring

    Thank you again, I get the following equation: m = k / ω^2 - m_0. That is to say, the representation of the mass against the inverse of the frequency at the cudrado should be the result of the constant of the spring, and as ordered in origin the effective mass of this. However, if we clear...
  26. C

    Doubts about the method of determining the elastic constant of a spring

    Thank you very much, the problem is that the spring has an effective mass, which should be added to the mass that is applied on the spring to use these equations, and this effective mass is unknown. If you develop both equations considering m = m_eff + m_applied, clearing the equation...
  27. C

    Doubts about the method of determining the elastic constant of a spring

    Good afternoon, I am preparing a laboratory report on the study of the oscillations of a spring and the following questions have arisen: The script asks us to represent the mass against the squared period, in this case, the slope will correspond to the spring constant divided by 4Π^2 and the...
  28. C

    Doubt about Jacobi's diagonalization method

    Thank you very much, I understand that the number of iterations is proportional to the size of the matrix to be diagonalized, but ... why does the rate of decrease of the largest element outside the diagonal increase as the number of iterations increases?
  29. C

    Doubt about Jacobi's diagonalization method

    Good Morning, I am using the Jacobi diagonalization method for symmetric matrices and I have realized that as the number of iterations progresses, the speed with which the larger element (in absolute value) outside the diagonal of the diagonal becomes smaller Matrices are increasing (graphical...
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