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    Millikan's Experiment

    Millikan did two famous experiments. One measured the charge on the electron. The other verified Einstein's theoretical work on the photoelectric effect, and in doing so, measured Planck's constant.
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    Momentum in explosions

    The angles are given with the directions. East and South East are 45º apart. You can also find a compass bearing of the thrid piece.
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    Gcse PHysics coursework practical help

    I don't know what good Ohm's law will do as that is to do with resistance in electrical circuits. Perhaps you meant Hooke's law? That would be a good start. We can discuss a little of the theory. What you can do is think of the average force acting on the rubber bands. When no force is...
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    Gcse PHysics coursework practical help

    Its mass and its shape are also factors.
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    Calculus problem.

    How? Using the quotient rule for the second term? Is that what you did?
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    Tension force

    ? Haven't you already posted that?
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    Tension force

    I'll explain the equations. They're to determine the net force on each mass. m1g - T = m1a The net force on the larger mass, m1, is equal to its weight minus the tension in the rope. The accleration of both masses is equal but the smaller one is travelling upward and the larger one is...
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    Tension force

    No. Think about it. How could the acceleration be greater than g?
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    Tension force

    The larger mass will move downward and the smaller mass will move upward. Just use the equations m1g - T = m1a and T - m2g = m2a To find the net force acting on each.
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    Calculus problem.

    To get L2 = h2 + 4h2/(h - 6)2 ...? Can I simplify it further?
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    Something i've been wondering about

    Fudge, I think college and university are synonymous in America and that 12th grade is equivalent to upper sixth-form. I think a GPA is a grade point average.
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    Calculus problem.

    So L2 = h2 + [(12/(h - 6)) + 2]2 = h2 + 144/[(h - 6)2] + 48/(h - 6) + 4 What's cancelling?
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    Mass and time question using calculus

    Well, I'm not sure that differentiating force with respect to time will be helpful here. I've thought a bit about this. You can find the acceleration of each particle as a function of their distance apart, although you need them as functions of time so you can integrate twice to get their...
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    Calculus problem.

    Okay, so I can do dL2/dx or dL2/dh rather than and dL/dx or dL/dh and that will make the maths easier. You've suggested dL2/dh. Substituting x = 12/(h - 6) into the equation for L2 means that I would have to differentiate h2 + [(12/(h - 6)) + 2]2 with respect to h. Right?
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    Mass and time question using calculus

    Integrating a force with respect to a distance gives energy.
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    Calculus problem.

    Not my own homework problem, but somebody else's. Parallel to a tall building runs a 6ft high fence. It is 2ft away from the building. What is the shortest ladder needed to reach the building from the other side of the fence? I've drawn a diagram for this problem (see attached). I've...
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    Polynomial factorization

    Yes, both arcnets and I know what a "factor of a polynomial" is- but that is not normally called a "factor of an equation". Also, you didn't say that "x-p" is a factor, you said "p is a factor". Well, I pointed out what the original poster was driving at, I didn't write the question. You...
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    Trig Problem(Law of Sines)

    Did you get the e-mail, Starky? Or did it not go through?
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    Springs - Hooke's Law

    Combine the equations to get the result Range = (kx2 sin 2θ)/mg I can't see it getting any easier.
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    Trig Problem(Law of Sines)

    I've drawn a diagram in paint, but it is not attaching because it is apparently too big, despite the fact that I've gotten the file size down to 9KB. Perhaps you could PM me your e-mail address and I can send it to you that way.
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    Trig Problem(Law of Sines)

    I'm pathetic with Latex as well, so bear with me. 2 boys desiring to estimate the height of a nearby radio tower measured the angle of elevation at their house and found it to be 52 degrees. they took a second measurement from the second-story window and found the angle of elevation to be 44...
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    Polynomial factorization

    Surely you must know what factorisation of polynomials is, Arcnets.
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    AS Physics Coursework

    One of the redeeming features of A-level physics with Edexcel is that there is no coursework.
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    AS Physics Coursework

    You have to do AS physics coursework? What exam board are you with?
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    The missing variable

    Whoops. It appears that I didn't actually solve the problem. But I think you can get the two charges' sum and product from this and you might be able to find them that way.
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    Can i post a list of my homework problems

    But how does it being of higher density show that the goldsmith didnt cheat the king. my weak point in physics are volume and density. Well, if it was of equivalent density it would show that the goldsmith didn't cheat the king. Density is mass per unit volume. ρ = m/V For a...
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    Work Energy Problems

    Yeah, you can use F = kx. The equation E = ½kx2 comes from the fact that W = FD. But here you have a force that increases as you extend the spring further, but the average force is equal to (0 + F)/2 = ½F And since from Hooke's law F = kx E = ½(kx)*x =...
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    Work Energy Problems

    Well W=FD right? D is .30 and the number of jumping jacks would be .30(x) with x. W would be 4186 J. And all i do is solve for x but i have a hard time remembering how to find F. W = FD is correct. The work done against gravity is equal to the distance moved upward multiplied by the force of...
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    The missing variable

    Well, it says that the charge is shared equally between the two objects, so just call the charge on each object q. Then F = k ((q * q)/r2) = (kq2)/r2 Now re-arrgange to find q: q2 = (Fr2)/k and q = ±√[(Fr2)/k] Since it didn't state whether the charge was...
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