Search results

  1. C

    AutoCAD inventor as CFD software

    Possibly in some limited form, but it is not going to work nearly as well as actual cfd software.
  2. C

    Radioactive alpha source question

    It really depends on the size and quantity of the material in question. Generally alpha radiation is extremely easy to block, even a piece of paper can stop most of it, so I would imagine you wouldn't need much more than a simple glass or plastic window to protect yourself.
  3. C

    Newbie from KC

    My passion really bounces around from thing to thing, but for the last few years of my teenage life I have had way too much fun building things that people tell me not to build just to show them wrong. I spend my time building things like extremely powerful lasers, tasers, rockets, Jacobs...
  4. C

    What would mixing different radioactive materials do?

    I was wondering about chemical reactions specifically.
  5. C

    What would mixing different radioactive materials do?

    If I was to throw together I variety of radioactive materials into a pot, what would be the interaction between the different materials? If I threw together Barium and Polonium, what would happen? What if I added Cesium, Europium, and Strontium to the mix? What about throwing in Uranium? Will...
  6. C

    Low pressure Fission reactor

    Hm.... interesting.
  7. C

    Low pressure Fission reactor

    Ok, thank you.
  8. C

    Low pressure Fission reactor

    Like what? A Thermoelectric generator? In pressure systems, isn't the work done by the pressure difference? Like I said, if you have a 18 psi boiler and a 14 psi condenser, isn't the amount of energy you can get out of it equal to the amount you can get out of a 8 psi boiler and a 4 psi...
  9. C

    Low pressure Fission reactor

    Ok, I think I understand, but isn't the amount of energy that you can extract from the steams pressure also dependent on the pressure difference? I mean, if you have a 18 psi boiler and a 14 psi condenser, isn't the amount of energy you can get out of it equal to the amount you can get out of a...
  10. C

    Low pressure Fission reactor

    I am still not sure I understand. If you have chamber A, where steam is produced, and it flows through a turbine into chamber B, which has a lower pressure than chamber A, how does equally increasing or decreasing the pressure in the chambers effect the amount of energy that is produced by the...
  11. C

    Low pressure Fission reactor

    I am not very familiar with Carnot Efficiency. I remember watching a video on Carnot engines a while back, basically explaining how an engine operating between a high temperature and a low temperature could not have greater efficiency than a Carnot system at the same temperatures. Could you...
  12. C

    Low pressure Fission reactor

    Why would it be inefficient?
  13. C

    Low pressure Fission reactor

    In small Fission reactors it can be hard to get enough heat in order to boil the water inside the boiler, so why don't we create low pressure boiler systems, where we can boil water at slightly above room temperature, use it to turn the steam turbine as it flows to the similarly low pressure...
  14. C

    B Calculating heat from decay of a radioactive isotope

    I would imagine so, however radiation such as beta and gamma tends to pass through most materials without reacting to them. Alpha particles are absorbed extremely easily and quickly, even a sheet of paper can block them.
  15. C

    Circuit with two voltage sources, finding voltage at nodes

    That is kinda confusing to me as well. An open circuit means the wires are cut off so there will be no current flow, but there is voltage, whereas a closed circuit means the wires are connected so there will be flow of current, but there is no voltage..... I think I get what you are saying, even...
  16. C

    B Calculating heat from decay of a radioactive isotope

    OK, fantastic. That was all very helpful guys.
  17. C

    Circuit with two voltage sources, finding voltage at nodes

    I believe so, seeing as how potential difference does not actually require current to flow, since electrical fields can exist in a vacuum. Voltage just represents stored energy that could be put to work if it was released.
  18. C

    I Nuclear reactors and nuclear bombs

    The heat is coming from two sources, a little bit from the kinetic energy of the fission process, but mostly from decay heat, which is generated when the radiation created by the decay of the radioactive material interacts with other materials, such as the coolant within your reactor. This...
  19. C

    B Calculating heat from decay of a radioactive isotope

    OK, so if I had 1 gram of Polonium 210, which produces 140 Joule/s, and it takes about 4 Joules to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1oC, to raise the temperature of 1 kilogram of water to from 23oC to 30oC would be 28000 Joules, that would be delivered over about 200 second? Is all...
  20. C

    B Calculating heat from decay of a radioactive isotope

    I would prefer to not assume that I would have a perfect adiabatic system, but since most commercially available VIPs reduce the amount of transferred heat to near inconsequential values, I suppose I can ignore this for the time being. Thanks.
  21. C

    Cautionary Tale of the Nipah Virus and the Need for Science

    That is actually really interesting. Thanks for sharing it!
  22. C

    B Calculating heat from decay of a radioactive isotope

    I suppose the most effective insulation would be a vacuum, so putting it inside of a vacuum chamber would be pretty good for such a small heat source...
  23. C

    B Calculating heat from decay of a radioactive isotope

    OK, what would you suggest I use to insulate it?
  24. C

    B Calculating heat from decay of a radioactive isotope

    Lets take Polonium 210, which has a half life of 138 days, has a (TBq/g) activity of 166, produces 140 watts/g, decays into Alpha radiation, and has 5.3 Million electron volts of alpha energy. If we put that into a gallon of water, insulated in say a quarter inch of steel, how much Polonium...
  25. C

    B Calculating heat from decay of a radioactive isotope

    Wouldn't that be almost insignificant? I mean, even a fast decaying particle such as Polonium, which has a pretty short half life of a hundred and thirty-something days is not going to have a major effect on the amount of heat generated in a short period that it would take to heat a cup of water.
  26. C

    Today I learned

    Today I learned that the hard part to building a Fission Reactor is not actually building one, or getting fissionable material, but finding a way to make it safe enough that you don't give yourself potentially harmful levels of radiation exposure.
  27. C

    Circuit with two voltage sources, finding voltage at nodes

    I would assume it has to do with how it is wired in parallel. In section B, where you have the 12v disconnected you do have 8.3v, but otherwise your stronger 12 volt power source is just discharging into the smaller one and providing a 11.3v charge to C. If you had it wired in series then you...
  28. C

    B Calculating heat from decay of a radioactive isotope

    How would one go about determining the amount of heat generated by the decay of a radioactive particle, such as Cesium 137, Polonium 210, or Strontium 90? How would you determine how much of the radioactive material would be needed to heat, say, a cup of water to a certain temperature, taking...
Top