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    The Fundamental Assumption of Statistical Mechanics

    You probably understand this by now, but to answer your second question, the reason it's very unlikely to be found in a state in which all of the atoms are in one corner is that there are (relatively) few of those states, compared to the number of homogeneous ones. The simple analogy is tossing...
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    Exercises in Statistical Mechanics

    I'm enjoying Lennard Susskind's lectures on Statistical mechanics. I've briefly studied this material before, but I've learnt a lot about more practical calculations from these lectures: he's used the partition function to derive all sorts of fun expressions, and to analyse the ideal gas and a...
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    Justification of generalisation from reversible processes to all procesess

    Thanks, I think that finally all makes sense, it all seems so simple now :) . It all works because the equation is only referring to changes of state functions within the system. Irrespective of what process is used to get from A to B, the changes in entropy, etc. will be the same. However, for...
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    Justification of generalisation from reversible processes to all procesess

    Thanks for your help! What you say makes a lot more sense. But given that, what does wikipedia mean when they say: "...This equation has been derived in the case of reversible changes. However, since U, S, and V are thermodynamic functions of state, the above relation holds also for...
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    Justification of generalisation from reversible processes to all procesess

    Hi all, I've been having some difficulty understanding the derivation of the Fundamental Theorem of Thermodynamics, dU=T \ dS-P \ dV. The derivation, which can be found at Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fundamental_thermodynamic_relation) first starts with the universal First Law...
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