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    Force at a particular point on a submerged vertical surface (other than Ycp)

    Have been trying to solve this but no luck. The issue that I'm having is that (from what I understand, please correct me if my understanding is wrong) that if there is a force at a particular point on a submerged body, let's say it acts a distance of Ycp. We know that from the surface it is at a...
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    Force at a particular point on a submerged vertical surface (other than Ycp)

    Hi voko Thanks for the help. I was able to calculate Fc (the latch) as you mentioned by taking moments about the hinges (the top view) so that only the Fc and the resultant are considered. This gave me the correct answer for force at C = 16.68kN. But I am still not able to picture how to take...
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    Force at a particular point on a submerged vertical surface (other than Ycp)

    Thanks for the reply. But I still have no idea how to go about calculating the forces at A,B and C I easily calculated the total force on the full door as 33.354 kN and this is acting at Ycp = 1.896m from the surface. I don't see how to use "sum of moments = 0" since there are three unknowns...
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    Force at a particular point on a submerged vertical surface (other than Ycp)

    Homework Statement https://www.dropbox.com/s/mw1ol8tnrdf0ajb/fm%20prob.JPG?dl=0 [/B] A 1-m wide by 2-m gate in the vertical wall of a reservoir functions like a door. It is hinged at A and B and latched at C. Determine the forces at A, B, and C when the water surface is 700 mm above the top...
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    How did they come up with this completed reaction

    Are you serious in asking me where the +ive charge on a hydronium ion came from????
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    How did they come up with this completed reaction

    Heavymetal: It's not a question about balancing!! I could balance the equation no problem. The question is why the reaction doesn't go this route: Na2CO3 + 2HCl ⇔ 2NaCl + H2CO3 The H2CO3 breaks down as follows: H2CO3+ H2O ⇔ H3O+ + HCO3 The HCO3 breaks down as follows: HCO3+...
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    How did they come up with this completed reaction

    This is what the completed reaction looks like Na2CO3 + 2HCl ⇔ 2NaCl + H2O + CO2 My question is how did they get the products in the above reaction. Here is my attempt, but I don't see how to get it like in the above reaction Na2CO3 + HCl ⇔ NaCl + HCO3 The HCO3 breaks down as follows...
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