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  1. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    What's in an electronics hobbyist's toolbox?

    Has anybody said coffee/Red Bull yet?
  2. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Motocross: Physics of the Scrub

    http://www.motorcycle-usa.com/2013/03/article/backmarker-breaking-down-the-bubba-scrub/ I know this may be old, but this also looks at some more physics behind the scrubbing. There seems to be a lot of physics going on in SuperCross, next you should look at the physics behind MotoGP Racers...
  3. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Physics is hard.

    Physics is hard.
  4. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    I CMA (Cylindrical Mirror Analyzer)

    Yes, my understanding was that it was like a spectrometer but wasn't sure what the advantage was. I thought we were going to be looking at the diffraction grating, but you are correct. It's the Auger electrons we'll be looking at. I was looking more for a deeper understanding than conceptual on...
  5. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    I CMA (Cylindrical Mirror Analyzer)

    I'm supposed to be working with a CMA (Cylindrical Mirror Analyzer), but I'm more interested in the physics behind it. This is the instrument in question that we are looking to get: http://www.rbdinstruments.com/products/micro-cma.html We want it to look at different eV levels of different...
  6. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Arduino Line Follower Robot

    Interesting, I've never worked with a Lego Mindstorm, so each different color was able to be given a new function? And how did you account for turning? Did you slow down one of the motors? Or just turn it off? I always wanted to play around with a mindstorm when I was younger, but could never...
  7. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Arduino Line Follower Robot

    Yeah I found a really good one on there that really helped me out thanks! http://www.instructables.com/id/A-Simple-Arduino-Based-Line-Follower/
  8. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Arduino Line Follower Robot

    I'm looking to build an Arduino that is capable of following a line depending on a colored strip on the ground, either black or white. I think I might use a LDR, but not quite sure where to even start to be honest. My office is having an Arduino contest, and I just want the Arduino to carry...
  9. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Associate in Science at NSTec

    Associate in Science at NSTec
  10. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Other Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences (alternative?)

    Do you have a recommendation of any other mathematical methods books that would be a bit easier to comprehend? I feel myself getting lost in the jumps boas does from explaining the basic concepts to jumping straight to certain complex ideas with little explanation.
  11. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    B What is the definition of a plane?

    When you say sphere, do you mean a 3D sphere, or a 2D circle that lives on a plane. You can define the sphere itself as a plane, and in calc 3 you learn that you can define shapes and do "pull backs" or "push forwards" in which you can stretch an object/shape/line and make it one to one to a...
  12. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Other Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences (alternative?)

    Is there any alternative books that teach you how to just do the problems rather than emphasizing why, and is there any books that emphasize why in an easier format? Something like a "mathematical methods for dummies" book? This is the book I'm referring to (...
  13. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Applied Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences by Mary L. Boas

    I believe that with the use of Green's theorem and some other integration techniques, you will need to look at techniques from Calc 3 and at least gone through Calc 1 and Calc 2. I know you posted this long time ago, but perhaps a member reading this will have the same question. Cheers!
  14. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    B What is the definition of a plane?

    I think you are thinking of it in reverse. You need things like linear algebra, planes, lines, etc. to define geometric shapes, not the other way around. Have you taken a multivariable course? Or have you heard of the idea of domains and sets of values living in a "neighborhood" of another...
  15. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Mass of half ball

    Oh okay, this clarified it for me, redid the problem and got it correctly, thank you! :woot:
  16. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Mass of half ball

    So just take the volume integral with the density formula and that will account for the change in density. But why is there no jacobian if we are changing coordinate systems we must account for this somehow...
  17. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Mass of half ball

    so triple integral from the bounds being the same as if i was finding half a sphere (obviously) times the Jacobian integrated with the density function in terms of spherical coordinates. That would be this equations ∫∫FoΦ(u,v)||Tu,Tv||dudv as this part ∫∫FoΦ(u,v)(((((||Tu,Tv||)))))dudv is the...
  18. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Mass of half ball

    How does this question differ from when they ask for the mass of a spherical shell. Because I can do the shell fine, but I just don't know how it jumps to volume... or when the object is full.
  19. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Mass of half ball

    Okay, I know to use spherical coordinates. I just am not sure which integral to use. That is my confusion.
  20. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Mass of half ball

    Yes, I know, there was a typo before, but the typo is no longer there, I already switched to spherical coordinates, hence the equation that I am using since I am perimeterizing.
  21. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Mass of half ball

    That was a typ-o from copying and pasting, I am still stuck on what to do...
  22. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Mass of half ball

    doesnt answer my question though.
  23. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Mass of half ball

    Oops it's supposed to be x^2+y^2+z^2=/< 4, so it would be best to convert to spherical coordinates.
  24. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Mass of half ball

    What I did in the previous problem was parameterize the surface, but that was asking for mass of shell, now it is mass of ball. So am I supposed to use volume then divide by the density? ? ?
  25. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Mass of half ball

    Tu stands for Φ(u,v) derivative with respect to u and Tv is Φ(u,v) with respect to v.
  26. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    Mass of half ball

    Homework Statement If the density of the half-ball x ^2 + y ^2 + z ^2 ≤ 4 ; z ≥ 0 is given by δ(x, y, z) = ( x^ 2 + y^ 2 + z ^2)^(1/2) find its mass. Homework Equations ∫∫F⋅ds ∫∫FoΦ(u,v)||Tu,Tv||dudv ∫∫FoΦ(u,v)⋅(Tu,Tv)dudv The Attempt at a Solution For the last problem I was asked to find...
  27. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    I Normalizing Constant 3D Infinite Well

    Right. So the purpose is to have the probability of the whole function sum up to 1. Okay. I went to office hours and got things clarified thank you!
  28. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    How can scientists trust closed source programs?

    But seems to be that open source allows for the users to sometimes find these errors before running the program or may be able to fix it. So it does solve somethings, but open source can then be more buggy depending on the support from the company right?
  29. RaulTheUCSCSlug

    I Normalizing Constant 3D Infinite Well

    So when A is (2/L)^3/2 then |\psi|^2 is equal to one since the probability density must go to one? So to solve for A one would just go through |\psi|^2 = 1 then solve for A?
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