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    First order differential equation

    I just don't think that the answer would be that obvious... Maybe I am wrong. Thanks for the input though guys, much appreciated.
  2. D

    First order differential equation

    Also, I am aware of the fact that the equation is a separable 1st order ordinary differential equation, but by substituting the factor e^tan-1(x), the answer will be in "e" format, which has no relevance to the given answers. There has to be a trick, or maybe I am just confusing myself even more.
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    First order differential equation

    All that I know, is that I have to find dy/dx from the equation x^2+1=y/(x-dy/dx). The multiple choice answers are the following: a)dy/dx= 2(x+y)^2+ (x/y) b)dy/dx=(2x-y)^2+(x/y) c)dy/dx=2(x-y)^2+(y/x) d)dy/dx=2(x-y)^2+(y/x) e)none of the above I have tried the advice hunt_mat has...
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    First order differential equation

    I think that I am supposed to calculate dy/dx by thinking that the equation given, is separable equation or linear. This is a first order differential equation, thus the answer cannot be this simple... Thanks for your contribution though.
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    First order differential equation

    Hi, Yeah i tried that before. If you can see under i), I have done that and got dy/dx = x - y/(x² + 1). However, that is not the correct answer.
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    First order differential equation

    Homework Statement Hi, If x^2+1=y/(x-y'), where y'=dy/dx, find dy/dx I have tried so many ways, but I cannot seem to get the correct answer. The answers I have got previously are: i) x² + 1 = y/(x - y') (x² + 1)(x - y') = y x(x² + 1) - y'(x² + 1) = y x(x² + 1) - y = y'(x² + 1)...
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    Help with Heaviside equations

    I have also got the same answer after researching on the internet for a while. Ta
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    Help with Heaviside equations

    Also, i) the answers are that left limit is 1, and the right limit is 2, and that g(x) is continuous at x=1; ii) that left limit is 2, and the right limit is 1, and that g(x) is not differentiable at x=1; iii) that left limit is 1, and the right limit is 2, and that g(x) is not differentiable...
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    Help with Heaviside equations

    Hi lanedance, However, I am still unsure what the limits would be. I reckon that both left limit (x^2 + 2 if x<=1) and right limit( x + 2 if x>1), should be infinite. Correct me if I am wrong. Though, at x=1, the limit would be 3 right?
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    Help with Heaviside equations

    Homework Statement g(x) = [ x^2 + 2 if x<=1 & x + 2 if x>1, I am asked to find the left and right limits, and whether the g(x) is continuous or not. Homework Equations The Attempt at a Solution When I draw the two equations, I get a hyperbola and a line of gradient 1. They...
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