Search results

  1. Z

    B Why isn't water on the ISS dangerous?

    Sorry, I wasn't sure if this counted as beginner since it's not about an actual astrophysical concept. So if only a little bit flies off, there isn't a risk of it short circuiting anything? Could the highly pure nature of the water also help this? For example, the numerous (but all tiny)...
  2. Z

    B Why isn't water on the ISS dangerous?

    Obviously, just about anywhere you go in the ISS, the walls are lined with electronics. Potentially a silly question, but why don't the astronauts need to be more careful when they handle water, considering that it could short circuit the electrical systems? Example:
  3. Z

    Stargazing Movement of Stars seen from the North Pole

    Thanks, I can see it now after a bit of visualization.
  4. Z

    Stargazing Movement of Stars seen from the North Pole

    Ah, I see what you mean there. In a purely theoretical sense, though, is it not true that the point exactly along the axis of rotation would not be rotating, even though every single other point would be rotating with the same angular speed? For example, with a merry go round, although no matter...
  5. Z

    Stargazing Movement of Stars seen from the North Pole

    Is that caused by being not exactly at the south pole, but near it, thus still rotating (which is why the sun appears to move in a circle)? I don't theoretically see how a point along the axis of rotation could be moving at all. The speed of rotation on Earth varies by the cosine of latitude, so...
  6. Z

    Stargazing Movement of Stars seen from the North Pole

    As in, at the point where the Earth's axis of rotation intersects with the surface, there is still rotation?
  7. Z

    Stargazing Movement of Stars seen from the North Pole

    From the perspective of someone at or near the exact north pole (where, for all practical purposes, they are not rotating), ignoring the gradual change of the stars as the Earth orbits the sun, would the stars appear to move at all in the night sky? Or would they be stationary because the...
  8. Z

    B Questions about Lunar Phases

    Thanks! So has it actually been documented how slightly different parts of the moon are visible at different places on Earth?
  9. Z

    B Questions about Lunar Phases

    My first question is: Shouldn't the lunar phases be thrown off by Earth's orbit of the sun? As in, after 6 months of orbit, since we are on opposite sides of the sun, the phases would be reversed so that the moon being in the same position relative to the Earth as it was before the 6 months...
  10. Z

    Question about Orbits of Moon/Earth around Sun

    How, exactly, is the moon able to orbit the Earth while at the same time moving with Earth's orbit of the Sun? I understand that the Earth/Moon both have the same accelerations caused by the Sun's gravity, but accelerations are not additive - only forces. At any time, the moon will be pulled by...
  11. Z

    What's going on in this snapshot from the ISS?

    I haven't noticed a black spot getting bigger, but it could just be camera imperfections. NASA explained in the article about it that the black/green line at the right is the result of how they merge differently colored images to create the normally colored one. It is indeed at L1.
  12. Z

    What's going on in this snapshot from the ISS?

    Ah, alright, after thinking it through it makes sense. The distance from the Earth to the moon is about 62.5 times the radius of the Earth; taking the angles in to consideration, it makes sense that from the DSCOVR satellite, the portion of the moon's orbit during which the moon appears to be in...
  13. Z

    What's going on in this snapshot from the ISS?

    The photos were taken between 3:50 and 8:45, a length of 4 hours and 55 minutes, so it would seem to make sense it didn't rotate much. In that time period, the moon would undergo about 0.0076 rotations. But judging by the pictures alone, shouldn't the moon be facing towards the center of the...
  14. Z

    What's going on in this snapshot from the ISS?

    Alright, thanks. Another thing I've found that confuses me is this view from NASA's DSCOVR satellite: It's obvious why the moon does not cast a shadow on the Earth, and NASA explained that the green lines to the side of the moon are caused by how they process the colors of the images, but I'm...
  15. Z

    What's going on in this snapshot from the ISS?

    Wait, so this is pre-recored?
  16. Z

    What's going on in this snapshot from the ISS?

    Yeah, it was in the unedited live stream. I don't really have any way to prove this, but I certainly didn't photoshop it or anything just to post it here in an attempt to confuse people.
  17. Z

    What's going on in this snapshot from the ISS?

    I did, indeed, take the screen shot myself. I saw the strange gray section on the Earth as it rotated, as if it was actually a part of the planet. Perhaps it was something wrong with my receiving of the image?
  18. Z

    What's going on in this snapshot from the ISS?

    Haha, I'm not one of those "flat Earth" morons. Thanks for looking in to it.
  19. Z

    What's going on in this snapshot from the ISS?

    Alright, thanks. Don't know much at all about optics, haha.
  20. Z

    What's going on in this snapshot from the ISS?

    Unfortunately, all I got of it was that screenshot. It was on the ISS livestream, so as far as I know, it hasn't been saved anywhere. What do you mean by imaging artifact?
  21. Z

    What's going on in this snapshot from the ISS?

    Yeah. I don't see how a camera error could make something like that, especially since the band moved with the Earth as the livestream progressed, as if it were actually on the Earth.
  22. Z

    What's going on in this snapshot from the ISS?

    I was watching the ISS live feed (from YouTube) and came across this strange look. https://gyazo.com/c5a09c7af0412c4c361fa0549b03a29d Does anyone know what would cause this in the live feed?
Top