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  1. H

    Is the energy of an electric field greater than the sum of its electrons' electric fields?

    As a final inquiry. Is there a convenient or approximate 'radius of the electron particle sphere' so-to-speak that we use to describe the size of an electron physically that allows all the math and energy to make sense? Something related to quantum mechanics? I'm imagining there are some...
  2. H

    Is the energy of an electric field greater than the sum of its electrons' electric fields?

    Thank you for the response. This is impressive. So there is a mathematical rationale which suggests that the diameter of an electron is not point-like and this is because the energy density of the field approaches infinity as the radius of the particle becomes zero?? Obviously that can't be...
  3. H

    Strange question about cancelling electric fields

    The energy from bringing them together is like a potential energy, right? Much like raising a weight in a gravitational field. If I 'release' the particles they will fly apart. Does that stored potential energy, that is part of the two particle system, have some physical position in the...
  4. H

    Strange question about cancelling electric fields

    If I may propose a hypothetical. Imagine two electrons existing in a void, spatially separated by a distance but in proximity. Each electron's electric field (due to their charge) wants to repel the other electron. Bringing them together required a small amount of energy to over come this...
  5. H

    Strange question about cancelling electric fields

    I am curious then, what happens to the energy that was required to create the two cancelling fields? I was under the impression that the energy was 'stored' in the field itself. Take an extreme example, where the energy to create these fields had a measurable gravitational contribution to the...
  6. H

    Strange question about cancelling electric fields

    I am curious about the case where two electric or magnetic fields cancel each other out (I'm assuming this is possible). If a charged particle travels through the region where the cancellation exists, I am assuming the particle behaves as if no field exists. Does that area still have electric...
  7. H

    Do electric fields have their own separate inherent charge?

    I am assuming the answer is NO. I realize that the electric field of any charged object has an energy density, but I was curious to know it that same field has it's own 'charge density' so to speak, and that it would have a small secondary electric field of it's own. This would imply that...
  8. H

    Is the energy of an electric field greater than the sum of its electrons' electric fields?

    I understand that the energy of an electric field arises from the work put into gathering the electrons together to create the field. Bringing electrons close together requires energy because they naturally want to repel. This potential energy is stored in the field itself and the field has an...
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