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  1. Lukeblackhill

    B "The Galaxy" vs Milky Way

    Thank you @CygnusX-1 , your answer was enriching.
  2. Lukeblackhill

    B "The Galaxy" vs Milky Way

    Good Morning, I've got a doubt originated from a statement of Berkeley Physics Course, Vol.1 - Mechanics, pg. 107, where in a footnote we read, "The systems are called galaxies, that one which contains our own sun is known as the Galaxy. The Milky Way is part of our galaxy". I've always...
  3. Lukeblackhill

    I What happens if two black holes collide

    @ohwilleke, it's not a mistake of spelling. In fact, I read about it in an article written by a Brazilian physicist, and that seems the way they write. I haven't read it in english, so I did not know how to write it.
  4. Lukeblackhill

    I What happens if two black holes collide

    @Dalton Peters, there's a theory which ascribes the existence of particles called Takions, which in theory has a mirror-sort of symmetry with the Lorent'z invariance. That means that Takions move faster than the speed of light and suffer the same effects einstein's predicted for normal...
  5. Lukeblackhill

    I What happens if two black holes collide

    It envolves the theory of General Relativity (what means a good deal of differential geometry) and concepts of topology, mainly those introduced by Sir Roger Penrose in the beginning of the 60's. I have a notion of it, but the calculations are quite complicated, more than my current level of...
  6. Lukeblackhill

    I What happens if two black holes collide

    @Dalton Peters , What happens when two black holes collide is better explain by Stephen Hawking's excellent work about the Event Horizon of black holes. Hawking discovered that when two black holes collide, they'll merge, and the new black hole formed will have the area of the even horizon (area...
  7. Lukeblackhill

    I Hubble red shifts could be gravitational red shifts rather than space-expansion red shifts?

    I understand. @phinds , I imagine you know that in general relativity the curvature of space-time does What happens is that General relativity doesn't seem to take conservation of energy into consideration. I hope the following extract from "Is Energy Conserved in General Relativity?", of...
  8. Lukeblackhill

    I Hubble red shifts could be gravitational red shifts rather than space-expansion red shifts?

    @phinds Do u have any ideas about how to solve the problem of conservation of energy on gravitational fields according to GR?
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