Search results

  1. J

    How does one find the maximum value of f given the graph of f'

    Which means that the line is going down. So if you go to the left, you're going up. So the father left, the higher up you are (assuming that there is not another change in slope). Umm... I'm afraid I'm a bit lost by attempting to visualize the answer. I think I would understand this more easily...
  2. J

    How does one find the maximum value of f given the graph of f'

    The top of the hill, of course :) And I understand the there is surely a "top" to the hill, however, how can I prove that it is on the interval [-5,6], and not somewhere farther to the left? How can I tell that x=-5 is not near the bottom of the hill?
  3. J

    How does one find the maximum value of f given the graph of f'

    Down, of course And I can see that x=-5 is a "high" point, but I don't see how to prove that it is the highest
  4. J

    How does one find the maximum value of f given the graph of f'

    Ummm... attempting to visualize it, but having some trouble. I do believe that the y value for x=-5 has to be greater than at x=-3 EDIT: Soo.. the slope is negative at -5, and still negative until 1. It is only positive on the interval (1,3). Logically, it seems that the y value could not go...
  5. J

    How does one find the maximum value of f given the graph of f'

    Umm..... The slope is negative, but is increasing, correct? Not sure if that was what you were looking for
  6. J

    How does one find the maximum value of f given the graph of f'

    That the slope is negative at that point on f(x)
  7. J

    How does one find the maximum value of f given the graph of f'

    But it is an endpoint! Endpoints are also possible candidates for maximum values on a closed interval. I do not know how to determine that it is the maximum value, however. EDIT: To clarify, -5 is an endpoint on the closed interval [-5,6]. The question asks for the maximum value on the interval...
  8. J

    How does one find the maximum value of f given the graph of f'

    Homework Statement The specific problem can be found here: http://www.cbsd.org/sites/teachers/hs/cmcglone/Student%20Documents/Chapter%204%20(Application%20of%20Derivatives)/Section%204.3%20-%20Olsen%20Curve%20Sketching%20Answers.pdf" [Broken] The above link also gives the answer. I am not sure...
  9. J

    Forces, involving tension and a pendulum

    I know it's no excuse, but I swear I have a horrible physics teacher... (by the way, this isn't just some new homework, but a take home test (so we are supposed to already know all of this)). I think I probably have a basic knowledge of it, I just do not know it... basically, we have probably...
  10. J

    Forces, involving tension and a pendulum

    AH, I get it now... Sorry I'm so slow... Okay, thanks. Then T1 is easy enough. Thanks. Haha... now (c).... I have absolutely no idea where to begin...
  11. J

    Forces, involving tension and a pendulum

    But would 3.01 not equal 2T2? but I kind of get it....
  12. J

    Forces, involving tension and a pendulum

    Which, I thought, was essentially what I did.... T1 = T2*Cos(37) / Cos(53), then plug that in.... (T2*Cos(37) / Cos(53))*Sin(53)+T2*Sin(37)=5N So, then set it equal to T2, as I did above. And then you have your answer... which I got as 1.213N. Where did I go wrong?
  13. J

    Forces, involving tension and a pendulum

    AH, now it all flashes back to me! haha. Thanks. Good old systems of equations and such. Really not sure if I did this right. Basically, after setting the first equation to equal T2, I got this: 2(T2)= (5N*Cos(theta1)) / (Cos(theta2)*Sin(theta1))+Sin(theta2)) wow, long... And so I got T2 =...
  14. J

    Forces, involving tension and a pendulum

    Homework Statement A ball of weight 5 N is suspended by two strings as shown [linked below]. (a) Draw and label all forces that act on the ball. (b)Determine the magnitude of each of the forces indicated in part (a). Suppose that the ball swings as a pendulum perpendicular to the plane of the...
  15. J

    Calculating the trajectory of a projectile

    *bump* so could someone just confirm that I did this correctly? Please? This is due tomorrow....
  16. J

    Calculating the trajectory of a projectile

    Homework Statement So, we have a physics project, in which we must build a water balloon launcher and launch the balloon at a stationary target about 50 yds away (normally we use meter, however we are firing on a football field). I have created my launcher (it is basically a slingshot), but...
  17. J

    How to find the initial velocity given only angle and distance traveled

    Yeah, I got it after a bit. Thanks for all the help. Sure I'll be back soon with more obvious physics questions, haha.
  18. J

    Calculate the initial velocity given degree and time

    *Bump* I really need help with this tonight...
  19. J

    Calculate the initial velocity given degree and time

    Homework Statement haha, so hopefully my last question for the night! Find the initial velocity, when the object is shot at 70 degrees and took 6.5s to land. (hint: look at the y direction first this time) (For more information regarding my question, visit my earlier question from tonight...
  20. J

    Calculate time traveled from launch to land

    Which is why I excluded 'a' when simplifying the equation, because a=0. Let me try that equation. Hmm... that seemed to yield a much more reasonable answer, 3.356s. That seems to be correct. Yeah, I get it now. It makes sense. Funny how things can just click and then you get it. Thank's for the...
  21. J

    Calculate time traveled from launch to land

    Homework Statement So, this is pretty easy and simple, I am just missing something obvious here I am pretty sure. This stems from a question I asked earlier tonight. Calculate the time it took from launch to land, given a velocity of 30.197m/s, and a distance traveled of 85m. (other...
  22. J

    How to find the initial velocity given only angle and distance traveled

    Hmm... do you think I could have help with that last question that was supposed to be easy enough, Calculate the time it took from launch to land? Sorry, but I am a bit stuck. So, I would use the formula X=Xo+Vot+.5at^2, correct? But then, I get a bit confused... -.5t^2=Vot-X divide by t...
  23. J

    How to find the initial velocity given only angle and distance traveled

    Ah, oops. Technicalities always seem to mess me up, haha. Thanks. This forum seems really cool. My physics teacher doesn't seem to know how to teach, so I'll probably be here a lot in the future, haha. Thanks again, you really saved me.
  24. J

    How to find the initial velocity given only angle and distance traveled

    V2=Vo2+2a(x-xo) ?? If V is 0, Vois 27.586, a is g, X is our unknown, and Xo is 0. So, 0=27.5862+(2)(9.8)(X) So, 27.5862 / (2)(9.8)= X Correct? Then, 38.826 would be the answer. I think I got it. Thanks :D
  25. J

    How to find the initial velocity given only angle and distance traveled

    Really, so 27.586 m/s would be correct, then, assuming I solved correctly for Vo? Great. Yes, so the object is at it's maximum height when V=0. V is decelerating at 9.8 m/s due to gravity. Now, I know that the angle, 33 degrees, is somehow involved here, no? But then what would my equation be...
  26. J

    How to find the initial velocity given only angle and distance traveled

    Homework Statement An object is shot (from a cannon) at an angle of 33 degrees and landed 85 m away. Calculate the magnitude of the initial velocity (Hint:Look at the x direction and solve for Vox) Homework Equations Other questions I must answer. If you have time, help with these would...
Top