Search results

  1. H

    Proportions math problem

    reason i say quadratic is because if a 10cm is $5, and a 20cm take four times the amount of raw materials, then it should cost four times the amount of a 10cm pizza. thus, it would cost $20.
  2. H

    Proportions math problem

    it seems to me that it would be quadratic.
  3. H

    Proportions math problem

    well as we doubled the diameter, the raw materials quadrupled.
  4. H

    Proportions math problem

    now the second part of this question says that suppose that the price of each pizza will be directly proportional to the amount of raw materials you use. if you were to model your pricing structure as "price as a function of diameter", then would you expect that model to be linear, quadratic, or...
  5. H

    Proportions math problem

    Homework Statement T or F? a pizza with 20cm diameter will require approximately half of the raw materials of pizza of diameter 40cm. explain your answer. Homework Equations The Attempt at a Solution my thinking is this, if we take the area of both pizzas, then we get 100(pi)...
  6. H

    Solving equations

    thanks! i appreciate everyone's help.
  7. H

    Solving equations

    hold on, if i plug in 1 for x, wouldn't i get 0 = 1???
  8. H

    Solving equations

    the way i see it is that for any value i plug in for x (except 1), the left hand side will always give me a complex answer which does not equal 1.
  9. H

    Solving equations

    if x < 1 then i will also get a complex solution here....therefore, i will always have a complex solution to the equation for any value of x except 0?
  10. H

    Solving equations

    it seems to me that stating that the equation will give a complex answer when x>1
  11. H

    Solving equations

    i'm not quite sure what it is the question is looking for .....
  12. H

    Solving equations

    thus, sqrt of 1-x will always give us a complex answer?
  13. H

    Solving equations

    i need some time to think about the reasoning here....i'm not quite sure i see it.
  14. H

    Solving equations

    i see....then, may I use the same reasoning for part (d)?
  15. H

    Solving equations

    well my thinking for part ii is that since (x-3) is always smaller than (x), then we would have a small number minus a big number which would give us a negative solution.....thus, since the equation is equalled to 5, there must be no solution.
  16. H

    Solving equations

    the only reason i can think of is that she's not really changing the orginal equation. she is only simplying it.
  17. H

    Solving equations

    Homework Statement I am having trouble with question 4(c).... part i and ii.... Homework Equations The Attempt at a Solution would it be okay for her to write iff between each line? I do not see why not but I cannot find the proper reasoning.
  18. H

    Rewrote f(x) in vertex form

    i got a[x+(b/2a)]^2 - [(b^2)/4a] + c where h=-(b/2a) and k=c-[(b^2)/4a]
  19. H

    Rewrote f(x) in vertex form

    Homework Statement Can someone assist me with number 3 please... Homework Equations The Attempt at a Solution I went ahead and rewrote f(x) in vertex form in terms of a,b, and c but i'm having a hard time writing down how f can be thought of as a transformation of g.
  20. H

    Analyzing student strategies

    I did look at b and her math is correct but it's the reasoning that I am not seeing. I would have just taken the original 4 scores, added the fifth score, and divided by 5.
  21. H

    Analyzing student strategies

    Homework Statement Homework Equations The Attempt at a Solution can someone help me out on #3 please. I can't see the reasoning behind her work.
  22. H

    Addressing student errors

    you are correct that she "should" get 4 and 11 but i guess it doesn't matter since her process and reasoning is incorrect. unless the professor made a mistake in typing this question....thank you both for your input.
  23. H

    Addressing student errors

    that makes sense as far as explaining her misunderstanding...but what about the property of fields/integral domains that her mistake is related to?
  24. H

    Addressing student errors

    Homework Statement Mindy solves the problem (x+4)(x-3)=8 by setting x+4=8 and x-3=8, thereby getting the solutin x=4 from both equations. she checks her answer by substituting x=4 into the original equation and finds that it works. She concludes that this quadratic equation has only one...
  25. H

    Abstract algebra

    also, how can i identify an isomorphism from H onto G? can i just say phi(a+b)=10^(a+b)=10^a times 10^b = phi(a) times phi(b). therefore, log (a+b) = log(a)log(b)???
  26. H

    Abstract algebra

    I'm sorry, but I still do not see how this applies to logarithms....how do logarithms apply in showing that R+ maps to R?
  27. H

    Abstract algebra

    1. Homework Statement [/b] The set of positive real numbers, R+, is a group under normal multiplication. The set of real numbers, R, is a group under normal addition. For the sake of clarity, we'll call these groups G and H respectively. Prove that G is isomorphic to H under the isomorphism...
  28. H

    Fermat's little theorem

    so now, if I want to show that (x^3)^2 is congruent to +/-1 (mod 7) would my work be correct? (please see the attachment).
  29. H

    Fermat's little theorem

    so how is this for an answer?: since 7 is a prime and the gcd(x,7) =1, then by Fermat's Little Theorem, x^(7-1)=x^6 is congruent to 1(mod7)
  30. H

    Fermat's little theorem

    it states that if (a,p)=1 then a^(p-1) is congruent to 1 (mod p)
Top