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  1. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    But clock at B will have more time on it upon A's arrival, according to the How could then A appear to tick faster, if then upon its arrival it is showing less time passed? Me neither.
  2. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    Hi. Thanks for responding to this question. But i think you reversed the order here. The moved clock (A) is lagging behind upon arrival according to the quote. So to me it seems that the clock B appears to tick faster according to the moving clock A. (disregading the doppler effect speeding it...
  3. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    The underlined portion implies distance 0 when comparing clocks. This is the exact opposite of what I found on the subject. Please consider the possibility that you are wrong and look it up. The terms concerning time of distant events always contain distance. I cant. I dont have the capacity...
  4. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    This is very similar to the twin paradox, and while the effect of time dilation is symmetrical to both of them, there is also the objective fact that one is aging faster, that fact is objective fact to all observers so it seems logical it would be propotional to the invariant- spacetime...
  5. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    I assume the mistake is that the original quoted formula holds true for all motion with constant velocity, it does not need to be in one inertial frame. Also it seems to describe an actual difference in time experienced. While the time dilation formula describes only observed difference in the...
  6. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    Equations by themselves are not proof of anything. As was said in the paper and quoted here in one of the posts according to Einstein you can put points A = B, then put the rails in a circle and do this and each time A will lag more and more behind B. You can also have the circle arbitrarily...
  7. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    He doesnt need to, there is no disparity in simultaneity involved at all. All the observations are made on objects at distance 0. There can be no difference in simultaneity. I dont know what you mean by "A stopping the time in the K frame" but I didnt talk about stopping time, but stopping the...
  8. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    This book costs like 100 euro. Thats a little too steep for a book dont you think?
  9. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    Not true. The Einstein's formula i quoted clearly applies to that. Do you disagree with that ? You still havent demonstrated why you should not read different clocks. "relativity of simultaneity " applies to observing distant objects, this does not happen here at all. Introducing it here only...
  10. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    Yes, but by being invariant doesnt this mean that both the stationary observer and the traveller on train will agree that it was the train who was moving and not the earth, or do I understand the concept of invariant wrongly?
  11. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    I found how to tell for which body the time runs faster - as Nugatory said it is given by the spacetime interval, which is invariant and therefore not relative value.
  12. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    Could you elaborate why such measurement would not tell anything about the rate of clock in the stationary time frame? If you were to stop at that given point, all the clock would tell you exactly the same time, is that not the definition of time in the other time frame?
  13. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    No. According to everything said here and also according to the twin paradox. The less time experienced is not an illusion or a matter of perspective. One HAS to be older and one HAS to be younger. If the asteroid hits the earth it would have been of different age -> therefore the universe must...
  14. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    Yes it does, but look I can find this stuff on my own. What still bothers me is that the moving clock still appears to be going faster for one observer according to my logic.. oh well nevermind
  15. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    Thats not possible as your ##t/\gamma## could approach zero, whereas in the quoted equation the time perceived by the traveller could only go to about half of its original time
  16. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    I understand you cannot use the one moving clock from the other frame, but i do not understand how you arrived at what you did, also it does not seem to correspond to what Albert arrived at. Your t / gamma is the time dilation equation, not like the one in OP.
  17. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    Well it should have a name, its from Einstein's paper. Its his setup, i think all i said is basically implied in the little quote i provided.
  18. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    I mean if an asteroid comes around Earth, its clock will not run at the same speed as ours. So how does the universe tell which clock should go faster and which slower
  19. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    And how do you tell which path through spacetime was longer?
  20. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    He looks at one clock at a time. Then he looks at another. What bad could happen there? Why does he have to consider anything about their synchronization, other than that they are synchronized in stationary frame? Does it not hold that all of their increments add up to the state of the final...
  21. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    So how does the universe know which should age faster.. the train or the rest of earth?
  22. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    Wow, that might be it. I was suspecting this will be completely different phenomena since the effect seems to be limited to 50% of stationary time.
  23. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    Im sorry but i dont know what primed and unprimed clock is. But i know that when A arrives at B its missing a portion of time, and this also holds true for every point between A and B, that is for every point of the travel the physical reality was that the A was progressively losing time and it...
  24. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    This is the next passage: Now it would appear this effect will persist even if you do not use different clocks each time as you can place A = B and follow any polygon or continuously curved line
  25. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    Note that relativity of simultaneity occurs only if you observe object in a distance, it never once happens in the experiment. And even if it did. The effect of this dilation (which happnes in every point on line AB) is physical effect with casual consequences to all inertial frames. While...
  26. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    Your argument still seems full of doppler effect. Why dont you use the thought experiment as described? There is no need to look at clocks at any distance other than 0. Or is your position that you cannot use the synchronized clocks?
  27. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    I understand how we both can see the other one's clock is running slow, because of the doppler effect, which is exactly what you described. However that is completely different phenomenon that is discussed in the Einstein paper and also here. That is why the thought experiment is described as it is.
  28. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    @ParticleGinger6 Still, in the equation i provided the limit seems to be 50% of the time in (K) when the speed approaches c
  29. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    @ParticleGinger6: gamma can go to infinity, no?
  30. M

    I Shouldn't a moving clock appear to be ticking faster instead of slower?

    The passenger can always look only at one clock at a time - the one hes passing by. So that we can say they are at the same location, so we do not need to talk about their synchronization from frame K' Also it is apparent that if the passenger were to add up all the time differences from the...
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