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  1. Fooality

    Omnidirectional air conditioner allowed by physics?

    Thanks Russ, bear in mind I’ve never studied physics, I’m just trying to figure what to read online to understand this, having a tough time finding resources on my own, and it’s interesting to me. I’ve already gotten some good hints in your words. By wire, it could be electrical, but really...
  2. Fooality

    Omnidirectional air conditioner allowed by physics?

    Indeed, mechanical energy is used to push the refrigerant around to create the cooling. I’m not interested in producing energy, I’m interested in if you can create only cooling in an area by pushing heat out somewhere else on a wire, rather than through e.g. an insulated air hose. My internal...
  3. Fooality

    Omnidirectional air conditioner allowed by physics?

    Sorry, sounded like you were going to tell me the law it violates, but I got an Amazon link to peltiers. Was that intentional? My setup sounds pretty sketchy to me intuitively, I have some air conditioner generating 5 units of heat outside 4 inside, and my hope is to just send 2 units of heat...
  4. Fooality

    Omnidirectional air conditioner allowed by physics?

    I know heat is a form of energy, and that’s conserved, so usually an air conditioner will emit heat on one side, cooling on the other, probably increasing the overall heat in total. What’s not clear to me is if it always must do this, specifically if the air conditioner produces another form...
  5. Fooality

    I Is information lost in wavefunction collapse?

    Thanks! I've been reading this thread, wishing people would take your question on. What I would say, having played with quantum computer simulators, is that the information relayed to an *observer* in bits is something like the base 2 logarithm of the reciprocal of the probability of...
  6. Fooality

    I Question about subtractive color mixing

    Question: If two guitar strings are very close in pitch but not quite the same, they "beat", as the two waves go between reinforcement and cancellation. Do light waves do the same? If so - and I know the frequencies are many orders of magnitude higher - how slow could it get? Could we ever make...
  7. Fooality

    Mind boggling machine learning results from AlphaZero

    Oh you're actually doing it? Cool good luck. If you can get the training data, I don't see why not.
  8. Fooality

    Mind boggling machine learning results from AlphaZero

    Yeah, good question. I know mathematical proofs we're one of the first thing they tried to unleash computers on in the 50s, and they meet their first failures in making machines think. There's more to it than just formal logic it seems. Thinking about Bridges of Königsberg problem solved by...
  9. Fooality

    Mind boggling machine learning results from AlphaZero

    I agree, its really compelling. That's why it's got me thinking about how far it is from being general AI. The game trees of these games the Alpha machines are playing are huge, so it must be abstracting lessons or rules already, classifying situations, generalizing in a sense. How far is it...
  10. Fooality

    Mind boggling machine learning results from AlphaZero

    It's really impressive. But in a sense I think does have training data, in terms of the games (as I understand it) it plays against itself. What seems unique is our ability to abstract general information from basic experience, like if one of these were able to see how programming was like...
  11. Fooality

    Mind boggling machine learning results from AlphaZero

    One thing I wonder about is the capacity to abstract generalized intelligence from the physical world. One thing that defines AI is the vast training sets, humans don't really use. But we do have vast training sets in terms of a continuous stream of experiences from birth, and somehow we are...
  12. Fooality

    Continuous-time loop computer for NP problems?

    I want to add a second thumbs up to Scott Aaronson's paper, it's a really good survey of it all. OP: The broader open question is whether physical systems can produce solutions to NP complete problems at all. He references an experiment with soap bubbles that seems to say yes, but it falls into...
  13. Fooality

    Shannon Entropy vs Entropy in chemistry

    One interesting area of overlap is in biology. Shannon information in an event is the log reciprocal of probability of event, which means high information events are less probable. So for instance odds of seeing 0 or 1 (-log2(1/2) = 1 bit) is more likely then seeing a specific million bit...
  14. Fooality

    Job Skills Increased demand for STEM in the next 4 years?

    The gist of this is true. Programming is what a computer science major learns in his or her first year, and somewhat second, the rest is computer science. You don't need to go to school for CS to get a job in programming, you need to program all the time on demonstrable open source projects, and...
  15. Fooality

    Real advances in Computer Science?

    That's part of the bigger picture of where I think its all going that involves a lot of other fields. People think of AI as about how we think, but in a broader sense its about a synthesizing a function with the same inputs and outputs as some natural function. So for example, insofar as a real...
  16. Fooality

    Real advances in Computer Science?

    Hey Sagant, I think you're asking the right questions. My major was in CS too, and as a guy who loves to ask the deep questions, I've found myself more and more of an armchair physics fan, though I didn't study it, especially trying to grasp quantum computers. If you ask me what sort of ideas...
  17. Fooality

    Real advances in Computer Science?

    I mean, it comes down to questions about whether math truth is discovered or created. I think its discovered, so if you didn't have Turing, who's model describes all computation you'd basically have someone else discover the same model, and the same mathematical truths like the halting problem...
  18. Fooality

    C/++/# Finding intersections in a given range ?

    Well, the main I need to make sure you are aware of is the complexity of the factorization a number into its prime factors, which is so hard its used in encryption schemes. You are pretty much left with brute force methods. One thing that isn't hard to do if S is small is to produce the...
  19. Fooality

    Real advances in Computer Science?

    There's so much overlap in fields. We have computers because of computer scientists and mathematicians, we have fast ones that fit in your pocket because of material scientists and physicists. So I assume you're asking about the purely CS stuff, not things like the work with silicon/transistors...
  20. Fooality

    Question About Digital Information

    Saw this post when it was posted, and it kind of stuck in my head. So I guess a discharged battery weighs less than a charged one. Also, the discharged battery has higher physical entropy. Relating that information entropy, it should take more information to exactly specify the state of the...
  21. Fooality

    Neural networks and music

    Just read this, a little late, but your search has been answered, Google is doing it! https://deepmind.com/blog/wavenet-generative-model-raw-audio/ Check out the classical piano scores, amazing!
  22. Fooality

    I What is a Photon

    I would love to learn the standard model in depth. Even if none of it pans out in terms of computation, the more I learn, the more I realize its a worthwhile thing just to know. Why, after all, are you a physicist? Done you feel a certain thrill at understanding this universe we live in at a...
  23. Fooality

    I Status of quantum computing

    Wikipedia is all one needs for that: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D-Wave_Systems On May 11, 2011, D-Wave Systems announced D-Wave One, described as "the world's first commercially available quantum computer", operating on a 128-qubit chipset[4] using quantum annealing (a general method for...
  24. Fooality

    I Status of quantum computing

    Quantum computers are in use now.
  25. Fooality

    I What is a Photon

    [Mentor's note: A digression on quantum computing has been moved into its own thread: https://www.physicsforums.com/threads/status-of-quantum-computing.880521/] [Broken] I don't know what you mean here. With classical waves, like audio, its pretty straightforward to compute their value along a...
  26. Fooality

    I What is a Photon

    Yes, and there are many attempts to do just that people are working on. My curiosity about QM came from the fact that the concept of rays is awkward for computation. I wondered if there was some other view, maybe waves or something else as far as a simplified approximation that might be out...
  27. Fooality

    I What is a Photon

    Thanks for your reply, and vanhees. Geometric optics has produced some really good simulations, (called ray tracing, ray marching etc) but they are also really expensive. There's big demand for shortcuts that can produce comparable results. My curiosity to look into QM came from asking the...
  28. Fooality

    I What is a Photon

    I just want to respond that I love posts that make QM approachable to non physics people. I am a computer science guy, and some very important problems in AI, augmented reality, VR and more can be tackled once a good, computationally affordable approximate simulation of the behavior of light can...
  29. Fooality

    How do computers 'interpret' machine language?

    Thanks for the clarity on how modern devices work. My point is just to make a crude sketch though: A digital circuit works by logically directing electricity to do things. The inputs decide where the electricity goes. That's how a CPU "intereprets" inputs.
  30. Fooality

    How do computers 'interpret' machine language?

    Hey, its important to remember that the information level is an abstraction of underlying physics. The underlying physics do the work. The underlying physics are those of semiconductors, materials that act special ways with electric current. Simply, think 1 means current on, 0 means current off...
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