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    Uniform Tension of Rope with Mass

    So the length of rope (dx) at the bottom of the curve would experience no tension? How does this translate for the chain link at the bottom of the curve?
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    Uniform Tension of Rope with Mass

    It answers a question that I asked.
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    Uniform Tension of Rope with Mass

    Sorry, I almost missed this post. I'm following you nicely I think. So, now follow my logic: Let's say that there are links in a chain and that every link can withstand the same amount of tension except for one link (the weak link). Now, let's assign values. Each strong link can withstand 15 N...
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    Uniform Tension of Rope with Mass

    Oh, yes I've seen some of this. Doesn't it involve hyperbolic trig functions? Does this formula also apply to vertically hanging ropes? Could one, say, use this to calculate the tension on a chain link?
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    Uniform Tension of Rope with Mass

    I am having trouble puzzling this one out. What I am trying to understand is why the tension of a rope is uniform throughout (even when there is mass). So I have knowledge that tension is in fact not a force (as it is a scalar quantity). You have two people pulling on a rope in opposite...
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    The Physics of Fire by Friction

    I can find the coefficient of kinetic friction for cottonwood on cottonwood (maybe...but wood on wood wouldn't be too far off). Calculating speed would be easy too because I can just figure out how many times I move the bow back and forth and how many times the spindle spins per stroke. I can...
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    The Physics of Fire by Friction

    I wasn't sure where to post this, so hopefully I didn't post it in the wrong place and hopefully I won't get flamed. Anyway, I am a boyscout and last weekend I was doing a demonstration on fire by friction. I use a bow drill. For those of you who do not know, this is how it works: A spindle...
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