Search results

  1. edguy99

    An Alternate Approach to Solving 2-Dimensional Elastic Collisions

    Great article, never thought about the relationship between refraction and momentum. Another amazing relationship is to apply a wave function to one of the particle sizes. Let one of the particles expand and contract at a certain frequency which adds to the dynamics of the collision (ie. if...
  2. edguy99

    I Width of one electron shell of a hydrogen atom

    Tell us about how the game works. Is it real time? Do you calculate forces between frames?
  3. edguy99

    I The uncertainty principle and moving reference frames

    Did not know this. Is there an example that would highlight the effect?
  4. edguy99

    A Interpretation of a state in quantum entanglement

    From the article: "Alice’s result (the prediction which she makes for Bob’s result) is immediately sent back to Bob via coaxial cables. If Alice detects no photon, Bob counts this as an inconclusive event from Alice (0)." They are throwing out all the "non-matches" as inconclusive. These would...
  5. edguy99

    A Interpretation of a state in quantum entanglement

    You are correct that the Jones vector does not predict perfect correlations at any angle. Do you have a reference for an experiment that has achieved "perfect correlations at any angle" without throwing out the non-correlated particles?
  6. edguy99

    A Interpretation of a state in quantum entanglement

    You cannot call a Jones vector a "hidden variable" wrt Bell inequalities since it does not match the model that Bell examined. Specifically, the Jones vector does not give "absolute" numbers (only probabilities) when measured outside the basis vector. Bell assumes a "absolute" match between...
  7. edguy99

    A Interpretation of a state in quantum entanglement

    Maybe I am missing something here. The Jones vector gives absolute numbers for u or d if measured on a basis vector, and the correct probability of an u or d measurement (cos^2 of the angle from the basis vector) when off the basis vector. Does not assuming the entangled particles have the same...
  8. edguy99

    A Interpretation of a state in quantum entanglement

    Assuming the particle can be described by it Jones vector and that entangled particles have matching Jones vectors, why invoke superdeterminism?
  9. edguy99

    A Interpretation of a state in quantum entanglement

    In itemizing the possibilities, aren't you missing 3) It is an intrinsic property that is acquired when the particles are entangled?
  10. edguy99

    Is there a place to get physics calculations done and/or double checked?

    I am just wondering if there is some way or online site to contact and/or hire "professionals" (students or otherwise) to get calculations done, kind of like a "angie's list" when looking for a plumber. One can do all the calculations themselves, but it saves a lot of time and significantly...
  11. edguy99

    Is there a place to get physics calculations done and/or double checked?

    Is there a place on physicsforums or elsewhere to get physics calculations done and/or double checked? When doing computer animations, many straight forward questions (homework level) often come up. Examples of the level of questions: 1/ What is the average speed of Oxygen2 molecules through...
  12. edguy99

    I Does the Chirality match the helicity?

    People talk about chirality in 2 different ways and it is often unclear. 1/ From the wiki neutrino page: "An experiment done in 1956 by C. S. Wu at Columbia University showed that neutrinos always have left-handed chirality." I think when they go on to say the neutrinos chirality matches its...
  13. edguy99

    I Does the Chirality match the helicity?

    I am not sure I agree, certainly the photons has that property, but also the neutrino, that does appear to have mass. From wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chirality_(physics) With the discovery of neutrino oscillation, which implies that neutrinos have mass, the only observed massless...
  14. edguy99

    I Does the Chirality match the helicity?

    What is the best way to explain "the chirality matches the helicity"? Why not include a visual?
  15. edguy99

    I Does the Chirality match the helicity?

    In trying to understand the Neutrino where it has mass and its chirality is the same as its helicity, I have always had trouble visualizing a particle. I recently ran into this particle. I believe the "the chirality is the same as helicity" as in one direction it would feed things through the...
  16. edguy99

    I Missing Mesons?

    Makes sense. Does that mean 1. we just cant tell the up/anti-up and down/anti-down particles apart, or 2. the up/anti-up and down/anti-down particles do not exist by themselves and there exists only a single particle that is a linear combination (or supposition) of the two?
  17. edguy99

    I Missing Mesons?

    Yes, I mentioned in my original post: (up/anti-up and down/anti-down) in supposition. The question remains about this particular meson: Why no down/anti-down meson?
  18. edguy99

    I Missing Mesons?

    In list of Mesons like this you see charm/anti-charm, strange/anti-strange and bottom/anti-bottom. You dont see up/anti-up or down/anti-down. Instead you see up/anti-down or (up/anti-up and down/anti-down) in supposition. Why no down/anti-down meson?
  19. edguy99

    I Interpretation of the photoelectric effect

    Thank you for the post. I have read a lot about ARPES experiments in the last 2 days and hope to learn more. What do the 3 labeled dispersion curves/bandlines say to you?
  20. edguy99

    I Interpretation of the photoelectric effect

    My google lookup of ARPES pulls up this pdf as the first item. In an effort to understand this better, I assume the hv jump from the bonded electrons (EB) are distinct and pretty clear. I also assume the jump from EF to a broader area is the conduction band you are talking about. I am unclear...
  21. edguy99

    I Physical Dimensions of electron shells

    Here are a couple of ideas, nothing models everything, but some parts work pretty well and each has its pros and cons. 1/ For electrons that are not bound, consider the energy needed to ionize Hydrogen never exceeds 13.6eVolts. This is the same as the coulomb force at 53 picometers (the Bohr...
  22. edguy99

    I Interpretation of the photoelectric effect

    Why do you make this conclusion? Wouldn't higher energy photons tend to pop out the electrons that are bound in some manner rather then the "effectively free" conduction band electrons?
  23. edguy99

    I Physical Dimensions of electron shells

    Thank you for the approximation on the Helium 1s² orbital. Information on shapes of orbitals is very hard to find. Like the OP, I am not so much interested in the calculations (although important of course), but am looking for published results to save time (but I am also happy with your...
  24. edguy99

    B Photon shape

    To me, the "wiggles" in the OP illustration are trying to get the point across that you need more red photons then blue photons to get the same amount of energy. In that sense, I think the author of the illustration is assuming the "wiggles" are individual photons. It is up to the author of an...
  25. edguy99

    B Photon shape

    Amplitude, in its meaning of the "intensity" of the light, would be represented by the number of "quanta" or photons flying through the air. Bright red light has lots of photons, but each photon would have the same wavelength, hence the same size "visually" to represent that.
  26. edguy99

    I Two orthonormal bases that span the same space

    Nothing. As I understand it, they will always be non-commutative unless the basis vectors of the two orthonormal measurement systems are orthonormal to each other (90 degrees sideways or verticle) and in your example, they are not.
  27. edguy99

    B Photon shape

    It is common to see the photons as little wiggles as in your first post. Sometimes "size" is used to signify wavelength (say 300nm) , ie. a little photon would signify high energy and fast wavelength, while splitting that photon into two with a crystal and getting two 600nm photons would be...
  28. edguy99

    B Photon shape

    The spot is representing the Landau & Lifshitz plane wave moving along the X-axis.
  29. edguy99

    B Photon shape

    I like this picture as it reflects many aspects of the photon, including reinforcement, cancellation and wave nature that one can visualize diffraction around corners. Landau & Lifshitz Vol. II. On page 108, the wave equation section talks about electromagnetic waves “in which the field...
  30. edguy99

    I Entanglement made easy?

    "To do this, the scientists turned the difficult analytical problem into an easy geometrical one. They showed that, in many cases, the amount of entanglement between states corresponds to the distance between two points on a Bloch sphere, which is basically a normal 3D sphere that physicists use...
Top