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    Question about HYDROSTATIC

    Before the solid was introduced, the height was 6'. After the solid, height 7'-3", approximately.
  2. V

    Question about HYDROSTATIC

    Ok gents, just to clarify... what is being said in a nutshell, and I'm going to use a basic example here... I have a tank 17'L x 8'D x 8'H and I fill to some height h1. If I then introduce a solid body which displaces the fluid a height of 2', does my hydrostatic pressure (force) on the walls...
  3. V

    Need help calculating Shear on a 5/8 square key

    Need help calculating Shear on a 5/8" square key PF, I am trying to figure out how to calculate the shear on a 5/8" x 5/8" x 3-1/2"L standard shaft key, when the OD of the shaft it fits into is 3". A tire of ~40" dia rides on the shaft and at any given time, let's say a load of 20,000lbs is...
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    Calculating Shaft Torque

    Bob, your explanation more closely correlates to what I seeing in the field wrt 2 - 3 HP motors moving heavy loads; after reading your post, I researched a little more to see where the Cf I've been using is much to large and none applicable in this case since it is a rolling friction and not...
  5. V

    Calculating Shaft Torque

    Yes, I am using an equation found on pp. 277 of the 25th editiong Machinery's Handbook which I thought was appropriate.
  6. V

    Calculating Shaft Torque

    Thank you jack action. The force required to get that size of a load moving is a concern for me; I am still working on this and have decided to increase the size of the electric motor from 3 to 5 HP (1750 RPM, 15.4-14.2/7.1 AMPS) as well as the shaft diameter. While reading through my...
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    Calculating Shaft Torque

    See attached sketch which represents total load of 40,000 lbs, including the parts and cart itself.
  8. V

    Calculating Shaft Torque

    At this point, I've got the following: Full Load Torque, T=5252 x 2.5 HP / 15.27 rpm = 859.85 lb-ft This calculated torque creates a driving force of [859.85 lb-ft / (7.5/12) =] 1375.77 lbs of force at the wheels (real-wheel driven when cart fully loaded). If I select a 3 HP electric...
  9. V

    Calculating Shaft Torque

    PF, I need to design a cart that will move (horizontally/linearly) a load of ~40,000 lbs including its own weight (about 6500 lbs) at a total distance of 70 ft on a set of rails. Known data: 1. Cart will need to move at a distance of 1 ft/s 2. Diameter of the cart wheels (4) is 15 in...
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