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  1. S

    Mixing water with steam, find equilibrim

    Okay Thank you very much!
  2. S

    Mixing water with steam, find equilibrim

    So the steam will always condense when in contact with water in lower temperature?
  3. S

    Mixing water with steam, find equilibrim

    Oh right. I understand. But can you explain a bit more on the heat exchange of condensation? I really want to fully understand it. Thanks a lot!
  4. S

    Mixing water with steam, find equilibrim

    Oh so you are saying that the steam will condensate? If that is the case, the total amount of water will become 500g + 100g = 600 g. But how does that happen? Isn't it water does not remove enough latent heat from the steam?
  5. S

    Mixing water with steam, find equilibrim

    I think the bubbles will float on the surface of the water... just guessing
  6. S

    Mixing water with steam, find equilibrim

    Theoretically, when water reaches 100C, they become steam?
  7. S

    Mixing water with steam, find equilibrim

    But how am I going to find the final temperature if all water is boiled?
  8. S

    Mixing water with steam, find equilibrim

    Homework Statement 100 g of steam at 100 °C is mixed with 500 g of water at 25 °C. What is the final temperature of the mixture? Homework Equations Q= mL Q= mcΔT The Attempt at a Solution Heat given by to water = heat loss at condensation = mLv...
  9. S

    Momentum and center of mass problem

    Homework Statement Homework Equations I don't know how is it related to center of mass. The Attempt at a Solution I don't know how to begin. Thanks a lot for your help !
  10. S

    Finding the center of mass

    Homework Statement A meter stick is 200 g. A mass of 1 kg is placed in 20 cm, and another mass of 5 kg is placed in 100 cm. So the diagram will be like: Homework Equations Why do we have to include M2? And why is the mass of M2 is 200g? Isn't the whole meter stick weight...
  11. S

    Why does impulse exist?

    Does it mean that impulse always exist during the collision?
  12. S

    Why does impulse exist?

    Hi guys. I just got a general question. Homework Statement I learned about impulse today in class, and I just wonder why it exists? Impulse is defined as "the change in momentum", but momentum is always conserved in elastic collision. Homework Equations So if momentum is conserved, why...
  13. S

    Work energy theorem lab

    Got it. Thank you so much for clearing up my confusions :)
  14. S

    Work energy theorem lab

    Yea I guess the data I got is probably not accurate. By the way,I am just asking, when I calculate the KE of the cart, should I use the mass of the cart only or the total mass of the system? And should I consider PE of the hanging mass?
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    Work energy theorem lab

    The work done by tension is supposed to equal to the change in kinetic energy of the cart, but I don't know why I can't get that result. There is a huge difference between the work and change in kinetic energy.
  16. S

    Work energy theorem lab

    I use computer to collect data for tension. I guess the energy of the dart comes from the hangingmass.
  17. S

    Work energy theorem lab

    I use computer to collect data for tension. I guess the energy of the dart comes from the hanging mass.
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    Work energy theorem lab

    Mentor's Note: This post and another have been merged at the member's request in order to attach their results. 1. Homework Statement See the attached picture for the lab setup. It is all about releasing a cart of 1.212 kg attached with a string and hanging masses. I recorded the Initial and...
  19. S

    Dynamic problem

    Homework Statement A student is skateboarding down a ramp that is 5.9 m long and inclined at 12° with respect to the horizontal. The initial speed of the skateboarder at the top of the ramp is 2.3 m/s. Neglect friction and find the speed at the bottom of the ramp. Homework Equations...
  20. S

    Heavier object has higher inertia

    I learn that inertia means the tendency an object will remain from changes. Heavier object has higher inertia, which means higher tendency to resist change. So, here is an example from my teacher. A car accelerates, the driver is pulled backward and hit the rear of his seat. This is due to...
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    Negative acceleration

    I know that "negative acceleration" can be slowing down, or going backward and speeding up. I read the old posts here and I am still confused. If no velocity are given, and you only know that the acceleration is, say, a= -5 m/s^2, how do you know the object is going forward or backward?
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