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1 Bar = ?

  1. Nov 17, 2003 #1
    What the conversion for bar so that I can use it to work out volume and temprature? Whats the units?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 17, 2003 #2
    1 bar = 100,000 pascals = 100,000 kg/m/s2
     
  4. Nov 17, 2003 #3
    Bit higher than I remember, but thanks!
     
  5. Nov 17, 2003 #4

    chroot

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    Re: Re: 1 Bar = ?

    Should be kg/m-s2

    - Warren
     
  6. Nov 17, 2003 #5
    Re: Re: Re: 1 Bar = ?

    Either way works.
     
  7. Nov 17, 2003 #6

    chroot

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    Not to be a pain in the ass, but I'd normally think

    kg/m/s^2 = kg s^2 / m

    But I guess it does come down to the conventional order of operations. I guess you win. Gack. I personally hate when people describe accelerations as "meters per second per second" i.e. m/s/s, for the same reason.

    - Warren
     
  8. Nov 18, 2003 #7

    Chi Meson

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    Interesting note:

    In the "common" world, a bar has the unit "kg/cm^2". THis is referring to the weight of one kilogram per square centimeter. THis of course translates to only 98,010 N per square meter, but somewhere along the line, "g" got upgraded to 10 N/kg instead of 9.801 N/kg.
     
  9. Nov 18, 2003 #8

    Njorl

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    So what is it in hpdpcf's (horsepower-decades per cubic furlong)?

    Njorl
     
  10. Nov 18, 2003 #9

    chroot

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    Uh.... no.

    1 bar is defined to be 100 kilopascals. A pascal is one newton per square meter. One kilogram-force is g newtons. Therefore, one pascal is (1/g) kilogram-force per square meter. Therefore, one bar is 100,000/g kilograms-force per square meter.

    g is accepted to be 9.80665 m/s^2, so one bar is 10,197.1621298 kilograms-force per square meter.

    I have no idea where you got the idea that someone rounded g to 10 m/s^2, but it never happened.

    - Warren
     
  11. Nov 18, 2003 #10
    1 bar = 3.4595574 hpdpcf's
     
  12. Nov 18, 2003 #11

    chroot

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  13. Nov 18, 2003 #12
    I used the Unix 'units' program, since I had a shell already open ...

    Code (Text):

    $ units
    2084 units, 71 prefixes, 32 nonlinear units

    You have: bar
    You want: horsepower-decade/furlong^3
            * 3.4595574
            / 0.28905432
     
     
  14. Nov 18, 2003 #13

    chroot

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    You think you're better than me, punk?








    - Warren
     
  15. Nov 19, 2003 #14

    Chi Meson

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    That's not what I meant, really. In Europe, the unit of bar and kg/cm^2 is used interchangeably (not by scientists, but by people pumping their bike tires). I remember several times over the years hearing anecdotaly that the bar was based on the "kg/cm^2" but was then redefined to be essentially 10 N/cm^2 (actually 1,000,000 dynes per cm^2)to be scientifically correct.

    So g was not the one that was adjusted. It's the bar that was raised.
     
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