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1-dimensional strings

  1. Jan 11, 2009 #1
    My question is simple and straight forward - how does a 1-dimensional string "convert" to a zero-dimensional point particle?

    And another one - for the purposes of physics, energy is not a physical object but an abstract mathematical construct. So how can a string of energy have a definite physical size(although it's the lowest tolerated by mathematical physics size - the Planck length)?

    Oops, here's another one - How on earth can a 1-dimensional string vibrate without employing a 2nd dimension? The drawings of this alleged physical object I've seen, all portray a 2-dimensional string(string is curved).

    What am I missing?
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2009
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 11, 2009 #2
    you cant have a string in 1 dimension can you? i mean that would just be a line, you would need at least two dimensions to have a string, but what does this have to do with string theory, dont they state that there is 10 or 11 dimensions depending on if its super symmetry. forgive me if im wrong but thats what I thought, im sure someone will clarify.
     
  4. Jan 12, 2009 #3

    jal

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  5. Jan 12, 2009 #4
    a one dimensional string was thought of as a zero dimensional point particle because of how small it was, and the more advanced mathematics behind the theory of strings. And energy is not a mathematical construct, its a real thing. You can have pure energy. Energy and mass are the same thing, just different forms. And just like you can have an object that we see every day of mass, you can have a string of zero mass and pure energy, like a photon or a string of energy. Also a string isn't really a one dimensional object, its just pictured that way, when really it is an object that vibrates in 10+ dimensions.
     
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