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13 TeV Collisions at the LHC!

  1. Jun 3, 2015 #1

    e.bar.goum

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    Today is an exciting day, for today will see a new record for the highest energy collisions at the LHC - stable 13 TeV collisions for new physics, signalling the start of the new physics program at the LHC!

    There are a few ways you can keep track of progress throughout the day.

    The LHC status pages: https://op-webtools.web.cern.ch/op-webtools/vistar/vistars.php?usr=LHC1
    https://op-webtools.web.cern.ch/op-webtools/vistar/vistars.php?usr=LHC3
    https://op-webtools.web.cern.ch/op-webtools/vistar/vistars.php?usr=LHCCOORD

    A webcast due to start at 8:20 Zurich: https://webcast.web.cern.ch/webcast/ (2 minutes from when I write this)

    A live blog: http://run2-13tev.web.cern.ch/

    And a hashtag - https://twitter.com/hashtag/13tev?src=hash&vertical=default&f=tweets
     
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  3. Jun 3, 2015 #2

    Orodruin

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    Boooooom! :biggrin:
     
  4. Jun 3, 2015 #3

    e.bar.goum

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    Yeah!
    CGkCClpUkAI862D.png

    Stable Beams: True.
     
  5. Jun 3, 2015 #4

    mfb

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    About 70/nb both for ATLAS and CMS. There should have been a few Higgs bosons in those collisions (the expected number is ~7)!
    It's just impossible to identify them with such a small dataset.
     
  6. Jun 3, 2015 #5

    George Jones

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  7. Jun 3, 2015 #6

    phion

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    Awesome.
     
  8. Jun 3, 2015 #7
    Very cool.

    Some acronym translations?

    BCT
    TED
    TDI
    BIS
    SMP

    What indicates a collision in the trend.
    I poked around the menu of screens and views. Is there any place to see the detector events?
     
  9. Jun 3, 2015 #8

    mfb

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    Which trend?

    No idea what the letters stand for:
    BCT is related to the transfer lines (for injection).
    TED/TDI are related to collimators and other settings for the beam position.
    BIS/SMP: Gives an overview over the machine status.

    The current collision rate can be seen at LHC operation: "Instantaneous luminosity". The design luminosity in those units is 10000/(μb*s), today we had 3/(μb*s).

    Event displays:
    ATLAS collisions
    CMS collisions
    LHCb collisions
    ALICE collisions
     
  10. Jun 3, 2015 #9
  11. Jun 3, 2015 #10
    Wow, so watching that ALICE view. When it updates and there a collision or collisions, is that live-ish? It updated a moment later and they went away.

    yeah, having these on my desktop, a click away, I really needed that....o0):woot:
     
  12. Jun 3, 2015 #11

    mfb

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    That page often does not tell you if there are collisions. Well, no beam no collisions obviously, but with beams you don't see it. Sometimes they add the luminosity plot to this page.

    It is measured somewhere outside the primary collision area, but I don't know where.

    The ALICE event display has a time given in the upper left corner. It is now 21:07 CERN time.
     
  13. Jun 3, 2015 #12
    I didn't realize today was the day already. Exciting!
     
  14. Jun 4, 2015 #13
  15. Jun 5, 2015 #14
    What does the teraelectronvolt mean when talking about collisions? Is that how hard the collision is or something?
    Very new to this side of physics, very cool though!
     
  16. Jun 5, 2015 #15

    mfb

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    It is the energy.
    1 eV = 1.6*10-19 J
    1 TeV = 1012 eV = 1.6*10-7 J, or, as WolframAlpha puts it, "approximate kinetic energy of a flying mosquito"

    Tiny in terms of macroscopic objects, huge for particles as small as protons.
     
  17. Jun 5, 2015 #16
    I knew it was the energy, I wasn't sure what it meant besides that.
    So if I understand correctly, it is the kinetic energy that the particles have before they are smashed into each other? And the higher the value, the more energy they have and therefore get smashed to bits even harder than they did before when using a lower TeV?
    Is it similar to when I would smash a wall, for example? The harder I smash it, the more it would crumble. If I were to give it a gentle touch, not much would be happening. If I were to want to knock it out and smash it to crumbles, I would use more force and therefore more kinetic energy. I would have to smash it faster and harder.
    Is that kind of how I should see it? A 1 TeV collision would be me giving the wall a gentle touch and the 13 TeV collision would be me smashing it harder and therefore it would crumble to smaller pieces and by that could see the smaller particles comprising of it?
    Or am I looking at it the wrong way by that?
     
  18. Jun 5, 2015 #17

    mfb

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    6.5 TeV is the energy used currently, yes. As two protons collide, the total energy is 13 TeV.
    They are not just "smashed to bits", completely new particles get created in those collisions. More energy makes that more frequent and allows the production of heavier particles.
     
  19. Jun 5, 2015 #18
    Ahhhh! Like that! I get it now.
    Thank you :)
     
  20. Jun 6, 2015 #19

    Orodruin

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    Just for reference since it was not mentioned in the recent discussion. One eV is the energy an electron (or any other particle of unit charge, so therefore also a proton) gains when accelerating across a potential of 1 V. LHC protons have an energy of 6.5 TeV, i.e., the energy equivalent too having been accelerated across 6500000000000 V.
     
  21. Jun 6, 2015 #20
    What limits them to keep increasing the energy ?
     
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