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19th century Women

  1. Oct 17, 2005 #1

    wolram

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    And how science ignored them.

    I have one example, Beatrix potter, best known for her writing, but could have
    become a scientist.
    Beatrix was taught at at home by a governess, while her brother Bertram was
    sent to boarding school, she had a love of drawing plants, animals, and more.
    In 1896 her uncle sir Henry Rosco took Beatrix with her drawings, to meet the
    director of the Royal Botanical Gardens and other botanists, they looked at her
    drawings but would not discuss them with her.
    After this disappointment, Beatrix wrote a paper about, spores of molds, which
    was read at the Linnaen Society of London, Beatrix could not read the paper
    her self as women were not allowed in these meetings.
    Betrix studied mycology, entomology, botany, geology may be others.
     
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  3. Oct 17, 2005 #2

    Math Is Hard

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    I had no idea. Seems like if she were living today she would have certainly become a botanist.
     
  4. Oct 17, 2005 #3

    wolram

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    May be this is where ignoring women as scientists originated.

    http://www.answers.com/topic/the-feminine-brain-a-19th-century-view

    Many great men of science had a low opinion of women. Aristotle, who used "pure logic" to infer that women have fewer teeth than men but never bothered to count women's teeth, said that women are passive and men active. He considered women as "mutilated men." Darwin and Freud also believed in the innate inferiority of women, and during the 19th century many scientists were convinced that women had to be less intelligent because of differences in brain structure.
     
  5. Oct 17, 2005 #4

    wolram

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    May be, it seems her writting was a second choise, what else could she do.
     
  6. Oct 17, 2005 #5

    Lisa!

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    I'd never heard of her! :blushing: But it was really interesting.
     
  7. Oct 17, 2005 #6

    Math Is Hard

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    I think a lot of it all boiled down to measurements in "cranial capacity" or skull volume. Women had smaller heads therefore smaller brains therefore were less intelligent. They said the same thing about black people. Did you ever read The Mismeasure of Man by Stephen Jay Gould? It's a wonderful book that covers this subject (the cranial capacity link to human intelligence myth) and much more.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2005
  8. Oct 17, 2005 #7

    wolram

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    That is one i have not read, MIH, aka, 7 of 9, i should read more :smile:
     
  9. Oct 17, 2005 #8

    matthyaouw

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    I never realised Beatrix Potter was so intellectual.
    I wonder if she would still have written her books were she a scientist. My childhood wouldn't have been quite the same without Peter Rabbit:
    http://wiredforbooks.org/kids/beatrix/p1.htm
     
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