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2^(2x+y) = (4^x)(2^y)?

  1. Oct 5, 2008 #1
    Is 22x+y = 4x2y? If I substitute various digits into the x and y variables, it works, but I can't understand why. Can anyone please explain this to me?

    For example, if we choose x=3 and y=1,
    2(2)(3)+1 = 27 = 128
    2(2)(3)+1 = 4321 = 64(2) = 128

    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 5, 2008 #2

    Integral

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    It follows from the basic rules of combining exponents.

    [tex] x^a x^b = x^{(a+b)} [/tex]

    [tex] x^{ab} = (x^a)^b [/tex]
     
  4. Oct 5, 2008 #3
    I can't believe I didn't figure that out. Thank you!
     
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