2 Balls on inclined plane problem

In summary, two identical balls are rolled down inclined planes of the same height but different inclines. The first question asks if they reach the bottom at the same time and the second asks if they have the same speed upon reaching the bottom. Neglecting friction and air resistance, the balls will slide and not roll. The first incline is almost vertical while the second has a tiny angle from the horizontal. The time it takes for the balls to reach the bottom will differ due to the different inclines.
  • #1
Bama
15
0
Identical balls are rolled down 2 inclined planes of the same height but different inclines. Do they reach the bottom at the same time. Neglect friction and air resistance.

Do the balls have the same speed upon reaching the bottom of the incline? :rolleyes:
 
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  • #2
do u mean planes of the same length?
 
  • #3
In my homework assignment, it doesn't mention length. Alicia0
 
  • #4
Bama said:
In my homework assignment, it doesn't mention length. Alicia0
The inclines cannot have the same length. The balls start from the same height, but one rolls down a shorter plane at a steeper angle.

The first question requires that you think in terms of forces and acclerations. The second is best thought about in terms of energy.
 
  • #5
Bama said:
Identical balls are rolled down 2 inclined planes of the same height but different inclines. Do they reach the bottom at the same time. Neglect friction and air resistance.

Do the balls have the same speed upon reaching the bottom of the incline? :rolleyes:

If the friction is neglected the balls will slide, will not roll at all.
 
  • #6
Imagine one incline almost vertical. How long would it take the ball to reach the ground?

Imagine the other incline with a tiny angle from the horizontal so its length is one mile. How long do you think it will take the ball to cover that one mile?
 

Question 1: What is the "2 Balls on Inclined Plane Problem"?

The "2 Balls on Inclined Plane Problem" is a physics problem that involves two balls, one placed at the top of an inclined plane and the other at the bottom. The goal is to determine the speed and distance that the first ball will travel down the plane and the time it takes for the second ball to reach the bottom.

Question 2: What are the key factors that affect the outcome of this problem?

The key factors that affect the outcome of the "2 Balls on Inclined Plane Problem" are the angle of the inclined plane, the mass and initial velocity of the first ball, and the coefficient of friction between the balls and the plane.

Question 3: How do you calculate the velocity and distance of the first ball down the inclined plane?

To calculate the velocity and distance of the first ball, we can use the equations of motion (such as Newton's second law and the kinematic equations) and consider the forces acting on the ball, such as gravity and friction. The angle of the inclined plane and the initial conditions of the ball (mass, initial velocity) will also be taken into account.

Question 4: How do you determine the time it takes for the second ball to reach the bottom of the inclined plane?

The time it takes for the second ball to reach the bottom of the inclined plane can be calculated by using the equations of motion and considering the forces acting on the ball. The angle of the inclined plane and the initial conditions of the ball will also be taken into account. Additionally, the distance that the first ball has traveled down the plane can be used to determine the time it takes for the second ball to reach the bottom.

Question 5: What are some real-world applications of the "2 Balls on Inclined Plane Problem"?

The "2 Balls on Inclined Plane Problem" has many real-world applications, such as in sports and engineering. It can be used to analyze the trajectory of a ball rolling down a hill or ramp, or the motion of a car on a sloped surface. It can also be applied in designing slides and roller coasters, as well as in understanding the motion of objects on uneven surfaces.

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