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> 2 majors

  1. Jul 9, 2008 #1
    Has anyone pulled off a a triple or a quadruple major or do you know anyone who has? I heard about someone at Cornell getting seven majors but that seems farfetched.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 9, 2008 #2
    I know someone who through the course of I dunno 12 years ended up with 5 majors. I just can't seem to justify anything more than two.
     
  4. Jul 9, 2008 #3
    Three, a few. Four, not that I can think of. Eventually you run into logistical issues.
     
  5. Jul 9, 2008 #4
    I know someone who triple majored in English/theater/psychology but that is much different than majoring in e.g. some engineering/foreign language/accounting. What I'm saying is that it would depend on the individual course loads and how much requirements and electives could overlap (also how much your university will allow them to overlap; at mine, the engineering electives specifically can not be obtained from the college of business possibly making some kind of business/engineering degree more difficult.)

    I really don't see much benefit of a third major anyway; I'm just a student so obviously my word wouldn't carry as much weight as a guidance or career counselor (which you may want to schedule an appointment with about this if it is what you are considering) it seems a bit unfocused and it would be better to pursue some research, upper level and graduate level classes within your major's department if you have so much free time.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2008
  6. Jul 9, 2008 #5

    cristo

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    I really dont understand the point of 'multiple majors.' A degree is supposed to say that you have somewhat specialist knowledge in a subject, but if you take many subjects then your knowledge will surely be diluted. I find this especially strange if one plans on graduate studies: there is way too much, say, physics to learn during a degree anyway, so why try and learn more than one subject? Also, if youre thinking of taking multiple majors purely to show off, then I would advise you against it: as the previous poster says, when (or if) you go to graduate school, it will benefit you much more to have taken higher level classes, and will look better on your application.
     
  7. Jul 9, 2008 #6
    On the undergraduate level, huge emphasis on the "somewhat."

    There are a lot of interdisciplinary fields. I'm for the idea of studying whatever interests you and working from there...majors can give you a way to document it if you go that far into more than one subject. But the things you know are what may matter, the line on your transcript saying you have an extra major probably won't.
     
  8. Jul 9, 2008 #7

    Astronuc

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    I had a friend in college who got a BA degree in Pyschology, Economics, French and History (IIRC), and he did it in 4 years. Basically, his electives for one course were requirements for another. He spoke French very well and was knowledgeable in the others.
     
  9. Jul 9, 2008 #8
    With that arrangement, he probably also overlapped a lot of general education requirements with the various major requirements.
     
  10. Jul 9, 2008 #9
    Is he super rich now?
     
  11. Jul 9, 2008 #10

    Astronuc

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    Yes. He didn't plan it that way until his junior year, when he had to fill out some degree plan, and then discovered that most of his course met most of the requirements of 4 majors. He then added the remaining requisite courses - and voila - 4 majors.
     
  12. Jul 9, 2008 #11

    Astronuc

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    No - unfortunately. He's a programmer - doing well, but not great. I think he burned himself out early on.
     
  13. Jul 9, 2008 #12

    Defennder

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    He certainly must be multi-talented. He did 4 majors in the arts and language and ended up as a programmer.
     
  14. Jul 9, 2008 #13
    "Programmer" seems to be the educated equivalent of "food service worker"...:rofl:

    Alas, poor code monkeys...oh well, someone has to work under all the software developers and computer scientists and other highfalutin' titles for "I'm not just another code monkey." I wouldn't laugh about this so much, but sadly it's where a lot of physics students wash ashore.
     
  15. Jul 9, 2008 #14
    I know a physics/math/history guy.

    Math is easy to tack on to physics, since physics requires so many math courses. The third major can be made up of a lot of the general education requirements.
     
  16. Jul 10, 2008 #15
    Math and physics seems to be a popular combination, but I'm firmly with cristo on this one. If you're going to be a theoretical physicist or an applied mathematician it's a strong combination, but I knew people who did it and wanted to go into experimental physics - why not take all that time spent in math courses and exchange it for lab courses and doing experimental research?
     
  17. Jul 10, 2008 #16
    I know a guy who did a quad major, and I'm about 90% sure he did it in four years. He might have come in with some AP/IB credit.

    Physics, mathematics, Earth science, physical science, and a minor in geospatial analysis.

    There's a lot of overlap there, but still...
     
  18. Jul 10, 2008 #17
    At my school a Physics degree only requires Calculus I & II, Multi, Diff-Eq, and Computational and Statistical Physics which are taught in the Physics department.

    A Mathematics degree requires a heck of a lot more - at least 10 more classes in the department within a specific area of focus the student chooses.
     
  19. Jul 10, 2008 #18

    cristo

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    That can't be true: how can a university warrant giving a physics degree to someone who has taken 4 maths classes and one physics class? :confused:
     
  20. Jul 10, 2008 #19
    Sorry I should have been more clear. Those are the Mathematics classes required for the Physics degree. And Computational/Statistical Physics are two separate classes - so essentially 6 math classes for Physics vs at least 15 for Mathematics.
     
  21. Jul 10, 2008 #20

    Tom Mattson

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    A former PF Mentor named Another God did a triple major. It was microbiology, philosophy, and something else. Smart guy.
     
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