2 symmetrical identical planets

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In summary, the conversation discusses the possibility of there being another Earth planet opposite to our Earth across the sun, and the likelihood of these two planets colliding due to other planetary influences. It is suggested that the solar system is not completely stable and could be disrupted by outside forces, but the odds of this happening are very low. The conversation also mentions that if there were another Earth planet, it would not get very close to our Earth due to its orbit. The question of why planets were formed singularly and not in pairs is also raised, with the explanation that they were formed from an accretion disc and the existence of two Earth-like planets would require many more smaller objects in Earth's orbit.
  • #1
pixel01
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Sometime ago, a guy asked about a scenario that if there were another Earth planet opposite to our Earth across the sun, could we identify it.
Now, my question is if the two finally would coalesce after some time?
 
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  • #2
Is it possible that the two planets would finally colide because besides the sun, they also were influenced by other planets and these influences were not identical to the two. So the symmetry would be broken after sometime.
 
  • #3
Yes, it's possible (though amazingly unikely!)

The solar system isn't completely stable, and could be messed up by something large coming from outside (or from the Oort cloud).
 
  • #4
The odds of something large coming from outside the solar system are negligable. Oort Cloud objects are not massive enough to significantly disrupt anything.

If there were another Earth opposite our Earth it would spend its time jumping from trojan orbit to horseshoe orbit with Earth. They would not get very close to each other.
 
  • #5
tony873004 said:
The odds of something large coming from outside the solar system are negligable. Oort Cloud objects are not massive enough to significantly disrupt anything.

If there were another Earth opposite our Earth it would spend its time jumping from trojan orbit to horseshoe orbit with Earth. They would not get very close to each other.

So why when the planets were formed, they were formed singularly. I means at the distance of Mercury, there is one Mercury, then one Venus, one Earth etc..
We know planets were formed from an accretion disc. If the 2 Earth could exist simultaneously, then there should have been many more smaller objects orbiting in the Earth's orbit now.
 

Related to 2 symmetrical identical planets

1. Are there really 2 symmetrical identical planets?

Yes, it is possible for there to be 2 symmetrical identical planets. This would mean that the planets have the same size, mass, composition, and features, making them essentially mirror images of each other.

2. How can 2 planets be symmetrical?

Two planets can be symmetrical if they have similar conditions during their formation. This could include being formed from the same cloud of gas and dust, having the same amount of rotational force, and experiencing similar levels of impact from other celestial bodies.

3. Is there any evidence of 2 symmetrical identical planets in our universe?

While there is no confirmed evidence of 2 symmetrical identical planets in our universe, there have been cases of planets with strikingly similar characteristics found orbiting different stars. However, more research is needed to determine if they are truly identical.

4. Could 2 symmetrical identical planets support life?

It is possible for 2 symmetrical identical planets to support life, as long as they have the necessary conditions for life to thrive. This could include a stable atmosphere, suitable temperature range, and the presence of liquid water.

5. How would 2 symmetrical identical planets affect each other's gravitational pull?

If 2 symmetrical identical planets were in close proximity, their gravitational pull would be equal and opposite, resulting in a stable orbit around each other. However, if they were too close, their gravitational forces could cause disruptions in their orbits and potentially alter the conditions for life on these planets.

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