2012 VP113 perihelion

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Despite having a highly elliptic orbit not being in the orbital plane of the hypothetical accretion disk, 2012 VP113 has its perihelion as it crosses the SS plane. That would imply that its line of apsides lies in the orbital plane of the major planets. That may be an unlikely accident but probably is important information.

How can this be explained and what does it tell us about it's origin? Are there other bodies which also have this odd property?
 

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Janus
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Despite having a highly elliptic orbit not being in the orbital plane of the hypothetical accretion disk, 2012 VP113 has its perihelion as it crosses the SS plane. That would imply that its line of apsides lies in the orbital plane of the major planets. That may be an unlikely accident but probably is important information.

How can this be explained and what does it tell us about it's origin? Are there other bodies which also have this odd property?
According to this:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2012_VP113
The argument of perihelion is 293.72°. The argument of perihelion is the measure between the ascending node ( where the orbit crosses the ecliptic) and the perihelion. For the perihelion to occur on the ecliptic, it would have to be at either the descending or ascending node and the argument of perihelion would be either 0° or 180°
 

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