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3 inches diameter fossil

  1. May 1, 2004 #1

    wolram

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    i found this in a quarry, it is round approx 3 inches diameter
    1.25 inches thick, concave both faces and has raised dimples
    on the side 180% apart, any ideas?
    i also found a smaller one identical description but only .75 inches
    diameter.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2004
  2. jcsd
  3. May 1, 2004 #2

    Evo

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    Staff: Mentor

    Do you have pictures of them? Have you looked on the internet? You can search by your region and then you can find pictures of different fossils. That's how I've indentified most of the fossils I've found, although I have found several odd ones (whole & intact) that I can find no desription of. One of these days I will get around to sending photos of them to the university here to see if they can identify them.
     
  4. May 1, 2004 #3

    wolram

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    hi EVO, no pics i haven't had time, i took the dog for a walk
    at local disused quarry and found them, they look like vertebra
    to me, Ive just been told a dino was found in that area years
    ago but no details yet.
     
  5. May 1, 2004 #4

    wolram

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    it was a 15ft dinosaur (a macroplata), no dates.
     
  6. May 1, 2004 #5

    wolram

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    http://www.geocities.com/sea_saur/news.html

    In the collections of the Warwick Museum (Feb, 2004), Is this fascinating framed newspaper clipping. A notice accompanying the frame reads: "The finding of a plesiosaur fossil in Harbury Quarry, Nov. 1927". There is no mention of the name of the newspaper. I have reproduced the text below. The observation of a "third eye" is probably a reference to the pineal foramen, an opening on the dorsal midline of the skull, although the interpretation of the feature here is rather appealing! After a little research, I have concluded that story covers the discovery of Macroplata tenuiceps Swinton 1930, the type species of the genus. The specimen remains under the reference number BMNH R.5488, in the Natural History.
    wow i had forgot about this, i think my grandad told me about years ago.
     
  7. May 1, 2004 #6

    Evo

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    Cool, sounds like you have a couple of dinosaur vertebra! I wonder if those are pieces missing from the one they found or if you have found evidence of another?
     
  8. May 2, 2004 #7

    wolram

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    i wonder, problem is i can not establish exactly where the
    first one was found, when i have time i will take the to the
    museum.
     
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