3D film glasses

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  • #26
mgb_phys
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How do they block?
LCDs

Samsung glasses are wireless and battery powered but weigh no more than my sunglasses, they are really nice.
I'm guessing you're under 30?
One problem the makers are facing is that young people are happier with large glasses / bluetooth headsets etc, while older people object to too much 'bling' on their faces.
That's a problem if you are trying to sell $2K TVs to people who already have flat screen TVs.

They don't work with regular TV.
They can with double rate blue-ray and a sync source.
Of course whether the makers enable this (standalone syncs etc) has an obvious answer!
 
  • #27
I'm guessing you're under 30?
One problem the makers are facing is that young people are happier with large glasses / bluetooth headsets etc, while older people object to too much 'bling' on their faces.
That's a problem if you are trying to sell $2K TVs to people who already have flat screen TVs.

!

Lol, I am under 30, almost there. I thought sunglasses were heavier in the old days. Anyways, its not like your wearing these things to the beach :P
 
  • #28
mgb_phys
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Lol, I am under 30, almost there. I thought sunglasses were heavier in the old days. Anyways, its not like your wearing these things to the beach :P

It sounds like a silly thing but if you are Sony or Panasonic and you present the active option to the board who are all over 60 and have never worn spectacles and they make the wrong decision it could cost $Bns.
 
  • #29
Well the technology is selling great at the theaters. I went to go see a 3D movie on a workday at 11am and not only was it sold out but there was a ton of people outside yelling about how they bought their tickets yesterday and demanding a seat. And it wasn't Avatar.

The theater glasses are heavier in my opinion, or the same weight but bulkier
 
  • #30
mgb_phys
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Movie theaters are hoping it will put bums on seats (like sound, color and cinemascope before it)
TV makers are hoping you are all going to go out and buy new TVs
TV companies are hoping it will be big for sport (and porn but they aren't saying that)
And the studios are hoping they can sell you all the movies you already bought on DVD and Blueray again in 3D!
 
  • #31
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Circular polarizers are a bit of a min-nomer.
They are really linearly polarized and then have a quarter wave plate to rotate the polarization.

You use circular polarizers because two different linear polarizations would have different effects on reflection from the screen or reflective objects in the shot.

A quarter wave plate turns the incoming circularly polarized light into linearly polarized light. Left-hand circular and right-hand circular will end up oriented 90 degrees from each other. Then you can selectively block one with a linear polarizer. Thus, the 3D glasses consist of a quarter wave plate followed by a linear polarizer.

The main reason for using circular polarization is so that each eye still gets the correct image even if you tilt your head.
 
  • #32
sophiecentaur
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Wouldn't those people have the same problem with their normal vision. When all is said and done the 3D technology is no different then how we see 3D all around us. We see two different images with different angles.

Yes, many people just don't have (or use) binocular vision. Giving them two stereo images won't portray a 3D effect. Stereo is not 3D - it's stereo.

But all of us get 3D information from other clues than binocular vision, like parallax when moving your viewpoint (moving the head) and contrast; distant objects are subject to scattering effects more than near objects (I think it was called 'perspective of light' by the old painters). Stereo only carries two images and it can be very striking at times but very much gives a feeling of 'layers', rather than natural 'depth'. You can see this effect even through large binoculars, which produce an exaggerated / artificial stereo effect due to the effective wider spacing of you eyes and the magnification of the image.

The stereo system cost is around twice that of a single image. Also, to get a 'good' pictorial effect for every scene in Stereo, you have to make significant compromises in the composition, depth of focus and layout - which actually restricts you quite severely at times.
Yes, it's a potentially very dramatic medium in certain appropriate circumstances but it certainly isn't what it's been cracked up to be. Big, sharp, bright pictures with good colourimetry are what is needed most of the time and, of course, Good Programme Material.
 
  • #33
Andy Resnick
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[...]colourimetry [...] Programme [...]

Ah... now I understand your 'plug-and-chug' comments. cheers!
 

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