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3way Valve Application

  1. Jul 6, 2006 #1
    I was wondering anyone could help me figure out the type of valve I need.

    The application is I have two sources of water going into the same reservoir and I want to be able to switch between the two.

    I am currently looking at Direct-Acting Solenoid Valves 3 way

    Now I am noticing some say universal and wondering if this is the type I need? What does it mean by universal? I want the water to be able to flow in either direction. In and out.

    Any suggestions and help is greatly appreciated thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 6, 2006 #2

    Integral

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    A manufacture and part number would help us.
     
  4. Jul 6, 2006 #3
    Cant figure out a way to bookmark this site but if you go to

    http://www.mcmaster.com/

    And catalog page 417 its at the top
    Brass Three-Way Solenoid Valves

    Looking at the diagram I'm not sure if it can do what I want if or if thats what the universal type is for.


    This is what I want:

    <---->|...|
    .........|...|<----->
    <---->|...|

    (periods/dots are just for proper alignment)

    config 1:

    <---->|...|
    .........| \_|<----->
    <---->|...|

    config 2:

    <---->|...|
    .........| _|<----->
    <---->|/..|

    One of two sources can be selected and it can flow in both directions.

    Thanks again, hope diagrams make sense
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2006
  5. Jul 6, 2006 #4

    Q_Goest

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    These are generally low pressure valves made by Asco for example. A lot of these valves are "unbalanced" which means that pressure has a tendancy to push the valve open. Thus, they can start leaking (internally) at a pressure below the normal operating pressure.

    A universal valve (per Asco) is a valve that can seal off internally at full rated pressure in all directions such that it doesn't matter if the port is pressurized not (ie: it doesn't matter if the port is an IN or an OUT port). The cost for having this feature is generally higher solenoid power for any given Cv, thought that's not always the case since many times the solenoid is oversized anyway.

    Other valves, such as 'Normally Open' or 'Normally Closed' have specific IN and OUT ports, and pressure in the opposite direction will cause the valve to leak. If you have a common, low pressure port that you're flowing to, you can probably use a NO or NC valve.

    Edit: I see our posts overlapped. From the last post you seem to indicate that you could have higher pressure on the common port which means you'll need a universal one.
     
  6. Jul 6, 2006 #5
    config 1:

    ----->|...|
    .........|\_|---->
    ----->|...|.......\
    .......................|
    .......................|
    .......................|
    <-----|...|......./
    .........|\_|<---
    <-----|...|

    config 2:
    ----->|...|
    .........| _|---->
    ----->|/..|.......\
    .......................|
    .......................|
    .......................|
    <-----|...|......./
    .........| _|<---
    <-----|/..|


    Heres the final looking application

    Two solenoids are connected by a tube where there are two different inputs and output reservoirs. The two solenoids will be wired to together to switch at the same time.

    So it seems if I got two of the 3way universal it would work?

    Also if I wanted to use a NO or NC could I? Since the second solenoid has one input and two outputs does this matter?

    Thanks again, I am extremely grateful.
     
  7. Jul 6, 2006 #6

    Q_Goest

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    From looking at your post #5, it looks like you only have flow in one direction (ie: pressure is always highest on the same side of your valve). If that's the case an NO or NC valve is fine. If the dP is low enough, it may still work just fine. If you need to operate the valve such that it blocks flow regardless of which port is pressurized, you need the universal one. Hope that helps.

    oh... and welcome to the board :smile:
     
  8. Jul 6, 2006 #7
    Thanks Q_Goest, you've been a great help!

    Looks like I'm going to go with two of the

    8111K45
    Brass Three-Way Solenoid Valve with Side Port NC, 1/4" NPT Female, .09 Cv Factor, Viton Seat

    from mcmaster, the ones on top of page 417.

    Thanks for the nice welcome :)
     
  9. Jul 6, 2006 #8

    FredGarvin

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    Asco makes some of the same solenoid valves. As a matter of fact, I wouldn't be surprised if the ones from McMaster weren't from Asco.
     
  10. Oct 17, 2006 #9
    think about this
    just use two valves
    both n.o. valves
    this way you can open one or the other or both at the same time
    the two smiple valve cost less than a 3-way
     
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