1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

4-Momenta Proton Qs.

  1. Nov 6, 2013 #1
    Hey all,

    I have a three part question:
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    If A^(3)=(Ax,Ay,Az) is the three-vector potential, J^(3)=(Jx,Jy,Jz) is the three-vector current density, [itex]\varphi[/itex] is the scalar potential and p is the charge density, then the four-current density J is given by:

    3. The attempt at a solution

    I have read through literature and believe the answer is:

    c=speed of light

    J=(cp Jx Jy Jz) -> I am confused because can this answer be written transposed in a matrix and still be correct or is this answer only valid in the form:

    J=(cp,Jx,Jy,Jz)?

    Part 2

    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    A photon is produced in frame S with 4-momentum P=(E/c,p,0,0) and frequency f , where hf=pc=E, p is the magnitude of the 3-momentum and E is the energy. Frame S' is travelling at speed v in the direction of the positive x axis of frame S. What is the relationship between the 4-momenta P and P in the two frames?

    3. The attempt at a solution

    Using invariance of 4-momentum, Squaring P' will yield:

    P'^2= (γP)^2 where γ is Lorentz factor 1/√1-v^2/c^2

    Thus sqrt answer is:

    P' = P/√(1-v^2/c^2)

    Is this correct?

    Part 3

    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    In the previous question, what is the relationship between the frequencies f and f' of the photon in the two frames?

    3. The attempt at a solution

    Taking inverse of f', you get

    f' = 1/(γf) = f*√(1-v^2/c^2) or is it take the square and then sqrt it to give:

    f'= f/√(1-v^2/c^2)

    That's it,

    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 6, 2013 #2
    Hi,

    no reply?

    Help?
     
  4. Nov 8, 2013 #3
    Hi,

    Looks like no reply, must be difficult questions.....

    Anyways, I just like to added that for part two:

    [itex]\overline{P}[/itex]=γP

    where P (NOT dashed) is the 4 momentum for frame S.

    Now if anyone can agree with me on this, easier to read, equation.

    Now for Part 3....

    Anyone?
     
  5. Nov 8, 2013 #4

    vela

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Education Advisor

    No, it isn't. You made two logical errors. First, in the very first step, you assumed ##p'^\mu = \gamma p^\mu##, yet this is what you're claiming to deduce. You can't assume what you're trying to prove. Second, even if the first line were valid, the second one doesn't follow from it logically. Just because two vectors have the same norm, it doesn't mean the vectors are proportional to each other.

    What you need to find out is how a four-vector transforms under a boost. This should be explained in your textbook.
     
  6. Nov 11, 2013 #5
    Hi vela,

    Thanks for replying. The lorentz boost (or the transformation) of any four vector is the lorentz matrix multiplied by the vector according the the article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lorentz_transformation#Transformation_of_other_physical_quantities.

    Essentially, the article is saying what I am saying:

    [itex]\overline{P}[/itex]= γP

    These questions are basically warm up questions to more 'applied' ones so the proofs aren't necessary as their comprehension is seen in the more latter questions.

    Does the rule apply similarly for the frequency of a proton (next part)?

    Thanks
     
  7. Nov 11, 2013 #6

    vela

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Education Advisor

    No, the article is not saying what you're saying. ##\gamma## is a scalar, not a matrix. As you noted,
    $$\gamma = \frac{1}{\sqrt{1-(v/c)^2}}.$$ How are you getting that multiplying by ##\gamma## is the same as multiplying by a matrix?
     
  8. Nov 11, 2013 #7
    Hi,

    I just noticed by assumption which as you said, is incorrect. I am using the gamma factor because I know the answer involved is P multiplied by a form/shape of the gamma factor (ie. sqrt (1-(v/c)^2)).
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: 4-Momenta Proton Qs.
  1. Magnetic field qs (Replies: 2)

  2. 2 Qs in QM. (Replies: 34)

  3. 4-momenta problem (Replies: 4)

Loading...