9 classes on one semester!

  • Thread starter Hurin
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  • #1
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Hi, this is my first post here. I'm now in my first semester of my freshmen year. This semester is about to over, and I'm planning my classes for the next one. I have a huge interests in pure mathematics and theoretical physics. But my doubts are regarding time; 9 classes in one semester (42 h/week).

The disciplines that I want to take are (mandatory courses in bold): Algebra I, Real Analysis, Calculus II, Linear algebra I, Introduction to Probability and Statistics, Introduction to Computation, Physics I (Classical mechanics), Chemistry Fundamentals for Physics and Experimental Physics II (experiments in classical mechanics). I have no interests in conserve my social life or good sleep, but I do not want to be reproved in any course; so please someone help me with this dilemma.

Thanks.

P.s.: This semester sucks, I have no fascinating classes (calculus I, introduction to physics, experimental physics I and vector geometry). Can someone indicate good textbooks in Algebra and Real Analysis?
Thanks again.
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
fss
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Are you even allowed by your university to take that many classes in a semester? Even if you were allowed and are an exceptional student, I don't see this working out well.
 
  • #3
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Are you even allowed by your university to take that many classes in a semester? Even if you were allowed and are an exceptional student, I don't see this working out well.
Yeah, it is allowed. i think that is a kind of trap, but it's allowed. If I keep only Algebra and analysis (and, of course, the mandatory ones) will it be difficult yet?
 
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  • #4
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I'm quite certain that your university won't allow it because of prerequisites. I don't think you can follow real analysis without taking calculus II or any proof-based class...
Real analysis is quite a hard class, you'll need to be accostumed to a lot of proofs before even attempting the class.
Also, probability and statistics will require some knowledge of calculus II and linear algebra, so you won't also be allowed to take that class... (and even if you are, it's very unwise to do so)
 
  • #5
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I'm quite certain that your university won't allow it because of prerequisites. I don't think you can follow real analysis without taking calculus II or any proof-based class...
Real analysis is quite a hard class, you'll need to be accostumed to a lot of proofs before even attempting the class.
Also, probability and statistics will require some knowledge of calculus II and linear algebra, so you won't also be allowed to take that class... (and even if you are, it's very unwise to do so)
Probability and statistics 1 is an introductory course and has no prerequisites. Real analysis has, indeed, calculus II as prerequisite. But, the professor told me that I can do both (calculus and analysis) if I require. Algebra I has no prerequisites. I don't know yet, if it's a hard class, I'll not take it. But how about algebra I?
 
  • #6
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Probability and statistics 1 is an introductory course and has no prerequisites. Real analysis has, indeed, calculus II as prerequisite. But, the professor told me that I can do both (calculus and analysis) if I require. Algebra I has no prerequisites. I don't know yet, if it's a hard class, I'll not take it. But how about algebra I?
I strongly suggest not taking real analysis until you have a lot more experience with proofs and calculus.

If I were you, I would also take less classes, and focus more on understanding the classes I do take. Knowing 4 courses very thoroughly is much better than knowing 9 courses a little bit...
 
  • #7
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You might be able to ace the classes, but you won't learn the material well and you will have poor retention.
 
  • #8
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Hold off on taking Algebra or Analysis this semester. I would suggest that you take about 6 of these, which will be much more doable.
 
  • #9
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Hi, this is my first post here. I'm now in my first semester of my freshmen year. This semester is about to over, and I'm planning my classes for the next one. I have a huge interests in pure mathematics and theoretical physics. But my doubts are regarding time; 9 classes in one semester (42 h/week).

The disciplines that I want to take are (mandatory courses in bold): Algebra I, Real Analysis, Calculus II, Linear algebra I, Introduction to Probability and Statistics, Introduction to Computation, Physics I (Classical mechanics), Chemistry Fundamentals for Physics and Experimental Physics II (experiments in classical mechanics). I have no interests in conserve my social life or good sleep, but I do not want to be reproved in any course; so please someone help me with this dilemma.

Thanks.

P.s.: This semester sucks, I have no fascinating classes (calculus I, introduction to physics, experimental physics I and vector geometry). Can someone indicate good textbooks in Algebra and Real Analysis?
Thanks again.
Personally, I would only suggest taking the courses that are required. Do you realize what Algebra I and Real Analysis are? Don't take those courses until you've completed multivariate calculus and Linear Algebra I(good intro to abstract algebra). Also, the probability and statistics course I'm taking this semester had a multivariate calculus as a pre-requisite. I'd say stick to 5 courses unless you wish for your grades and/or life and/or understanding of the material to suffer. Most likely all 3 things will suffer if you take more than 5 courses(and I doubt most students could pass Abstract Algebra and Real Analysis right after Calculus I even if those were the only courses they were taking that semester).
 
  • #10
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That would be one rough semester.
 
  • #12
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Think about it this way: Would you rather devote your time to actually learning and being able to retain what you learnt in the semester or would you like to cram everything? You'll find yourself looking for shortcuts to every single assignment and homework because of the lack of time you would have. Just think about finals week.
 
  • #13
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9 courses in one semester? How could all 9 courses NOT have conflicts?? Is this even possible lol?
 
  • #14
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Thank you everyone.

9 courses in one semester? How could all 9 courses NOT have conflicts?? Is this even possible lol?
I can take classes in diurnal and nocturne periods.
 
  • #15
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Thank you everyone.



I can take classes in diurnal and nocturne periods.
So you won't have time to study...? If you go to class day and night, how could you have time to eat, sleep, and study?
 
  • #16
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I agree with not taking Analysis and Algebra till you have a bit more math under your belt.

Intro to Prob is usually a very simple class designed for health/business majors but I dunno if thats true for you. Usually a good Prob/Stat class will also need calculus.
 
  • #17
Nabeshin
Science Advisor
2,205
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Here's a thought: Why on earth do you need to take 9 classes your 2nd semester out of eight? Are you planning on exhausting all the courses at your university by the fourth semester and sipping martinis for the last four?
 
  • #18
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Let's do the math here. There's 168 hours in a week. You said that 9 classes would be 42 hrs a week. If you want to do well, you're probably going to want to spend a good 2 hours, minimum, on homework per hour of class time, considering how hard those classes are. That means you're spending at least around 126 on school every week, including homework and class time. Add in 8 hours of sleep per night (you'll need it with stress levels like that), and you're left with... negative 14 hours per week for everything else, like eating, commuting, relaxing. Take into consideration those weeks where you get a bunch of projects at once (that will happen) and you've got even more negative hours left over. Yep, sounds feasible to me...

If you're aiming for A's, you're going to have a psychological breakdown or something. If you're not aiming for A's, you should take (far) fewer classes and aim for A's.
 
  • #19
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I am doing something simila
Until when do you have to decide?
I think in some weeks (2 or three) I could tell you how it works for me, so
you could write me a private message then (if you are Interested)?
 
  • #20
350
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Let's do the math here. There's 168 hours in a week. You said that 9 classes would be 42 hrs a week. If you want to do well, you're probably going to want to spend a good 2 hours, minimum, on homework per hour of class time, considering how hard those classes are. That means you're spending at least around 126 on school every week, including homework and class time. Add in 8 hours of sleep per night (you'll need it with stress levels like that), and you're left with... negative 14 hours per week for everything else, like eating, commuting, relaxing. Take into consideration those weeks where you get a bunch of projects at once (that will happen) and you've got even more negative hours left over. Yep, sounds feasible to me...

If you're aiming for A's, you're going to have a psychological breakdown or something. If you're not aiming for A's, you should take (far) fewer classes and aim for A's.
This is a good post. If you're planning to take 5 math classes next semester you could at least do this little amount of math and realize that this isn't feasible. I wouldn't go beyond 6 classes personally.
 

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