1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

A baseball is thrown directly upward and hits the ground several hundred feet away.

  1. Sep 11, 2012 #1
    Are there any points along its path at which the velocity and acceleration vectors are perpendicular? Parallel? Also, if a ball is thrown directly upward, wouldn't it fall directly back down?




    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 11, 2012 #2

    NascentOxygen

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Re: A baseball is thrown directly upward and hits the ground several hundred feet awa

    Was it thrown by a spin bowler? Are there strong winds? Could the throw have taken it to the top of a cliff several hundred feet above the thrower? Must this have occurred on any particular planet? Did the ball encounter something solid in its path, and bounce off it?
     
  4. Sep 11, 2012 #3
    Re: A baseball is thrown directly upward and hits the ground several hundred feet awa

    Nope, the question did not specify strong winds, or other planetary properties. I'm going to assume that it wasn't thrown directly upward and that it was thrown at an angle.
     
  5. Sep 11, 2012 #4
    Re: A baseball is thrown directly upward and hits the ground several hundred feet awa

    Therefore, with the assumption that I made, correct me if I am wrong, the resultant velocity only allows the vector to be perpendicular at the top of the trajectory and never parallel at any point in time and space.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: A baseball is thrown directly upward and hits the ground several hundred feet away.
  1. A baseball is thrown (Replies: 4)

  2. Hitting a baseball (Replies: 1)

  3. Baseball Hit (Replies: 1)

Loading...