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A Better Mechanics Book?

  1. Nov 13, 2006 #1
    I am really struggling through Symon. I understand the mathematical proofs and perhaps the reasoning as well, but I really have problems completing any of the exercises. [I am speaking primarily of Ch.3 and later.] Without thorough examples worked step-by-step, I often find it very difficult to decide how to even begin solving the problems. Unfortunately, my prof doesn't do many examples either, so I'm at my wits end. Does anyone know a good Mechanics book with plenty of examples (particularly when it comes to rotating coordinate systems) that I could use as a second reference? A prof recommended Marion, but I can't seem to find a copy around here.

    Thanks,
    Ben
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2006
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 13, 2006 #2

    marcusl

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    I thought Marion was pretty good when I used it. I recommended it to my son as a supplement when he took Mechanics, and he liked it enough to buy a used copy. Check used sites like www.bookfinder.com if you'd like to do the same. He found an inexpensive copy of the 2nd (1970) edition.
    Edit: You might ask your professor to loan you his copy for a week if you want to check it out!
     
  4. Nov 13, 2006 #3

    robphy

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  5. Nov 13, 2006 #4

    D H

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    Third vote for Marion.

    My copy is 30 years old and getting a bit worn.

    I have seen other books that do a much better treatment of rotational dynamics, but those tend to be graduate level texts.
     
  6. Nov 14, 2006 #5
    Thanks for the tip, you guys. I'll see if I can find a copy somewhere.
     
  7. Dec 8, 2006 #6
    Marion and Thornton's Classical Dynamics of Particles & Systems is what I use, along with Kleppner's and Kolenkow's An Introduction to Mechanics, although the latter is greatly simplified.
     
  8. Dec 9, 2006 #7

    dextercioby

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    After reading Marion, just for fun, see if you can follow Landau & Lifschitz' treatment. Just for fun.

    It should be a useful reading.

    Daniel.
     
  9. Dec 9, 2006 #8

    Dr Transport

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    Marion, Schaums, then Goldstein and Landau. Know those and you'll know more mechanics than you'll ever want to admit.
     
  10. Dec 9, 2006 #9
    Are you guys referring to an older edition of Marion? The Amazon reviews of Marion and Thronton doesn't seem very good.
     
  11. Dec 9, 2006 #10

    JesseM

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    One of those amazon reviews says the problem is with Thornton's additions:
    Here is a link to the amazon page for the second revised edition, and here is the first edition. If you plug the ISBNs into bookhq.com you can probably find cheaper used copies.
     
  12. Dec 9, 2006 #11

    marcusl

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    Yes, I was referring to the 2nd edition. I haven't looked at the 3rd.
     
  13. Dec 9, 2006 #12
    Thank you, JesseM and marcusl.
     
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